Galilei, Galileo, De Motu Antiquiora

List of thumbnails

< >
21
21
22
22
23
23
24
24
25
25
26
26
27
27
28
28
29
29
30
30
< >
page |< < of 161 > >|

Search results

< >
Searching "tower" (fulltextMorph)
(...) in its motion a space of time of a hundred hours? or, if from a high tower (...) were thrown at the same moment, that, when the smaller was at mid-tower, the larger would already have reached the ground?
(...) as swiftly as the other, and then releases them from the top of a tower, it will certainly not hit the ground faster, twice as swiftly: (...)
(...) it be that the south wind, which turns the sea topsy-turvy, toppling towers and fortifications, whips more softly than the small hammer, which (...)
(...) were true, it would follow that a stone going down from a very high tower would be moved more slowly at mid-tower, than if the same stone were falling to the ground from a very low (...)
(...) fourth well-known argument concerning a large stone going down from a tower, which will not be sufficiently blocked by a pebble impelled upward (...)
(...) is not astonishing if the stone, released from merely the height of a tower, will seem to accelerate all the way to the ground; for this short (...)
(...) that it leaves the wood behind, and, if they are released from a high tower, the lead gets ahead of it by a large distance: and I have often (...)
But if we go up a very high tower, on the top of which there is a bathtub, the same thing will happen (...)
For if a stone goes down from a high tower (...) with a great impressed force, which the motion from the height of a tower (...) swiftness is always intensified all through the height of a single tower.

Text layer

  • Dictionary
  • Search results

Text normalization

  • Original
  • Regularized
  • Normalized

Search


Clear
  • Exact
  • All forms
  • Fulltext index
  • Morphological index