Galilei, Galileo, Mechanics, 1665

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            <pb xlink:href="070/01/006.jpg" pagenum="276"/>
            <p type="head">
              <s>SUPPOSITIONS.</s>
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              <s>Any Grave Body, (as to what belongeth to it's proper ver­
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              tue) moveth downwards, ſo that the Center of it's Gravity
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              never ſtrayeth out of that Right Line which is produced
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              from the ſaid Center placed in the firſt Term of the Motion unto
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              the univerſal Center of Grave Bodies. </s>
              <s>Which is a Suppoſition
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              very manifeſt, becauſe that ſingle Center being obliged to endea­
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              vour to unite with the common Center, it's neceſſary, unleſſe ſome
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              impediment intervene, that it go ſeeking it by the ſhorteſt Line,
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              which is the Right alone: And from hence may we ſecondarily
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              ſuppoſe</s>
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              <s>Every Grave Body putteth the greateſt ſtreſſe, and weigheth
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              moſt on the Center of it's Gravity, and to it, as to its proper ſeat,
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              all
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              Impetus,
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              all Ponderoſity, and, in ſome, all Moment hath re­
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              courſe.</s>
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              <s>We laſtly ſuppoſe the Center of the Gravity of two Bodies e­
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              qually Grave to be in the midſt of that Right Line which conjoyns
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              the ſaid two Centers; or that two equall weights, ſuſpended in
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              equall diſtence, ſhall have the point of
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              Equilibrium
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              in the common
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              Center, or meeting of thoſe equal Diſtances. </s>
              <s>As for Example,
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              the Diſtance C E being equall to the Diſtance E D, and there be­
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              ing by them two equall weights ſuſpended, A and B, we ſuppoſe
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              the point of
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              Equilibrium
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              to be in the point E, there being no
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              greater reaſon for inclining to
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              one, then to the other part. </s>
              <s>But
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                <figure id="id.070.01.006.1.jpg" xlink:href="070/01/006/1.jpg"/>
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              here is to be noted, that the Di­
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              ſtances ought to be meaſured
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              with Perpendicular Lines, which
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              from the point of Suſpenſion E,
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              fall on the Right Lines, that from
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              the Center of the Gravity of the
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              Weights A and B, are drawn to
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              the common Center of things
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              Grave; and therefore if the Diſtance E D were tranſported into
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              E F, the weight B would not counterpoiſe the weight A, becauſe
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              drawing from the Centers of Gravity two Right Lines to the Cen­
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              ter of the Earth, we ſhall ſee that which cometh from the Center
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              of the Weight I, to be nearer to the Center E, then the other
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              produced from the Center of the weight A. </s>
              <s>Therefore our ſaying
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              that equal Weights are ſuſpended by [or at] equal Diſtances, is
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              to be underſtood to be meant when as the Right Lines that go from
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              their Centers & to ſeek out the common Center of Gravity, ſhall be
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              equidiſta nt from that Right Line, which is produced from the ſaid </s>
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          </chap>
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