Galilei, Galileo, Mechanics, 1665

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              <s>
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              Lines, which fall at Right Angles on thoſe whereon the Weights
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              hang, and would move, if ſo be they were permitted to deſcend
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              freely.</s>
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              <s>Of the BALLANCE and LEAVER.</s>
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              <s>Having underſtood by certain Demonſtration, one of the
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              firſt Principles, from which, as from a plentiſul Fountain,
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              many of the Mechanical Inſtruments are derived, we may
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              take occaſion without any difficulty to come to the knowledge of
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              the nature of them: and firſt ſpeaking of the Stiliard, an Inſtru­
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              ment of moſt ordinary uſe, with which divers Merchandizes are
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              weighed, ſuſtaining them, though very heavy, with a very ſmall
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              counterpoiſe, which is com­
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              monly called the Roman or
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                <figure id="id.070.01.009.1.jpg" xlink:href="070/01/009/1.jpg"/>
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              Plummet, we ſhall prove that
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              there is no more to be done in
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              ſuch an operation, but to re­
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              duce into act and practice
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              what hath been above contemplated. </s>
              <s>For if we propoſe the Bal­
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              lance A B, whoſe Fulciment or Lanquet is in the point C, by
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              which, at the ſmall Diſtance C A, hangeth the heavy Weight D,
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              and if along the other greater C B, (which we call the Needle of
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              the Stiliard) we ſhould ſuppoſe the Roman F, though of but little
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              weight in compariſon of the Grave Body D to be ſlipped to and
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              fro, it ſhall be pofſible to place it ſo remotely from the Lanquet C,
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              that the ſame proportion may be found between the two Weights
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              D and F, as is between the Diſtances F C, and C A: and then ſhall
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              an
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              Equilibrium
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              ſucceed; unequall Weights hanging at Diſtances
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              alternately proportional to them.</s>
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              <s>Nor is this Inſtrument different from that other called
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              Vectis,
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              and vulgarly the ^{*} Leaver, wherewith great Weights are moved
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              by ſmall Force; the application of which is according to the Fi­
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              gure prefixed; wherein the Leaver
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              is repreſented by the Bar of wood
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              or other ſolid matter,
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              B
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              C D, let
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                <figure id="id.070.01.009.2.jpg" xlink:href="070/01/009/2.jpg"/>
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              the heavy Weight to be raiſed be
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              A, and let the ſteadfaſt ſupport
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              or Fulciment on which the Leaver
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              reſts and moves be ſuppoſed to be
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              E, and putting one end of the
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              Leaver under the Weight A, as
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              may be ſeen in the point C, en­
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              creaſing the Weight or Force at the other end D, it will be able
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              to lift up the Weight A, though not much, whenever the Force in </s>
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