Galilei, Galileo, Discourse concerning the natation of bodies, 1663

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namely, that Earth is leſs Grave than Water. The Veſſel that ſwims
occupieth in the water, not only a place equall to the Maſs of the
Earth, of which it is formed; but equall to the Earth and to the Air
together, contained in its concavity.
And, if ſuch a Maſs compoun­
ded of Earth and Air, ſhall be leſs grave than ſuch another quantity
of water, it ſhall ſwim, and ſhall accord with the Doctrine of Archi­
medes; but if, again, removing the Air, the Veſſell ſhall be filled
with water, ſo that the Solid put in the water, be nothing but
Earth, nor occupieth other place, than that which is only poſſeſt by
Earth, it ſhall then go to the Bottom, by reaſon that the Earth is
heavier than the water: and this correſponds well with the meaning
of Archimedes. See the ſame effect illuſtrated, with ſuch another
Experiment, In preſſing a Viall Glaſs to the Bottom of the water,
when it is full of Air, it will meet with great reſiſtance, becauſe it is
not the Glaſs alone, that is preſſed under water, but together with
the Glaſs a great Maſs of Air, and ſuch, that if you ſhould take as
much water, as the Maſs of the Glaſs, and of the Air contained in it,
you would have a weight much greater than that of the Viall, and of
its Air: and, therefore, it will not ſubmerge without great violence:
but if we demit only the Glaſs into the water, which ſhall be when
you ſhall fill the Glaſs with water, then ſhall the Glaſs deſcend to
the Bottom; as ſuperiour in Gravity to the water.
The Authors an­
ſwer to the ſe­
cond Objection.

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