Galilei, Galileo, Discourse concerning the natation of bodies, 1663

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the ſaid calid Atomes aſcend with much greater Force and Velocity
through the Air, than through the water.
And if this be ſo, as I veri­
ly believe it is, the Objection of Ariſtotle in my judgement ſeems to
give occaſion of ſuſpecting, that he may poſſibly be deceived in more
than one particular: Firſt, becauſe thoſe calid Atomes, (whether
they be Fiery Corpuſcles, or whether they be Exhalations, or in
ſhort, whatever other matter they be, that aſcends upwards through
the Air) cannot be believed to mount faſter through Air, than
through water: but rather on the contrary, they peradventure move
more impetuouſly through the water, than through the Air, as hath
been in part demonſtrated above.
And here I cannot finde the rea­
ſon, why Ariſtotle ſeeing, that the deſeending Motion of the ſame
Moveable, is more ſwift in Air, than in water, hath not advertiſed
us, that from the contrary Motion, the contrary ſhould neceſſarily
follow; to wit, that it is more ſwift in the water, than in the Air: for
ſince that the Moveable which deſcendeth, moves ſwifter through
the Air, than through the water, if we ſhould ſuppoſe its Gravity
gradually to diminiſh, it would firſt become ſuch, that deſcending
ſwiftly through the Air, it would deſcend but ſlowly through the
water: and then again, it might be ſuch, that deſcending in the
Air, it ſhould aſcend in the water: and being made yet leſs grave,
it ſhall aſcend ſwiftly through the water, and yet deſcend likewiſe
through the Air: and in ſhort, before it can begin to aſcend, though
but ſlowly through the Air, it ſhall aſcend ſwiftly through the water:
how then is it true, that aſcending Moveables move ſwifter through
the Air, than through the water?
Democritus con­
futed by Ari­
ſtotle, text 43.
Ariſtotles con­
futation of De­
mocritus refuted
by the Author.

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