Galilei, Galileo, Discourse concerning the natation of bodies, 1663

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    <archimedes>
      <text>
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            <p type="main">
              <s>
                <pb pagenum="405"/>
              Bottom of Water, is the exceſſe of their Gravity, above the
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              Gravity of the Water; and on the contrary, the exceſs of the
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              Waters Gravity above the Gravity of thoſe, is the Cauſe that others
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              do not deſcend, rather that they riſe from the Bottom, and aſcend
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              to the Surface. </s>
              <s>This was ſubtilly demonſtrated by
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              Archimedes
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              in
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              his Book Of the NATATION of BODIES: Conferred afterwards
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              by a very grave Author, but, if I erre not inviſibly, as below for
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              defence of him, I ſhall endeavour to prove.</s>
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            <p type="margin">
              <s>
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              merſion of Sol­
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              ids in the Wa­
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              ter.</s>
            </p>
            <p type="main">
              <s>I, with a different Method, and by other meanes, will endeavour
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              to demonſtrate the ſame, reducing the Cauſes of ſuch Effects to
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              more intrinſecall and immediate Principles, in which alſo are diſco­
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              vered the Cauſes of ſome admirable and almoſt incredible Acci­
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              dents, as that would be, that a very little quantity of Water, ſhould
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              be able, with its ſmall weight, to raiſe and ſuſtain a Solid Body, an
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              hundred or a thouſand times heavier than it.</s>
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            <p type="main">
              <s>And becauſe demonſtrative Order ſo requires, I ſhall define cer­
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              tain Termes, and afterwards explain ſome Propoſitions, of which,
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              as of things true and obvious, I may make uſe of to my preſent pur­
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              poſe.</s>
            </p>
            <p type="head">
              <s>DEFINITION I.</s>
            </p>
            <p type="main">
              <s>
                <emph type="italics"/>
              I then call equally Grave
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              in ſpecie,
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              thoſe Matters
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              of which equall Maſſes weigh equally.
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              </s>
            </p>
            <p type="main">
              <s>As if for example, two Balls, one of Wax, and the other of ſome
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              Wood of equall Maſſe, were alſo equall in Weight, we ſay, that
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              ſuch Wood, and the Wax are
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              in ſpecie
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              equally grave.</s>
            </p>
            <p type="head">
              <s>DEFINITION II.</s>
            </p>
            <p type="main">
              <s>
                <emph type="italics"/>
              But equally grave in Abſolute Gravity, we call two
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              Sollids, weighing equally, though of Maſs they be
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              unequall.
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              </s>
            </p>
            <p type="main">
              <s>As for example, a Maſs of Lead, and another of Wood, that
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              weigh each ten pounds, I call equall in Abſolute Gravity, though
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              the Maſs of the Wood be much greater then that of the Lead.</s>
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            <p type="main">
              <s>
                <emph type="italics"/>
              And, conſequently, leſs Grave
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              in ſpecie.</s>
            </p>
            <p type="head">
              <s>DEFINITION III.</s>
            </p>
            <p type="main">
              <s>
                <emph type="italics"/>
              I call a Matter more Grave
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              in ſpecie
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              than another, of
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              which a Maſs, equall to a Maſs of the other, ſhall
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              weigh more.
                <emph.end type="italics"/>
              </s>
            </p>
          </chap>
        </body>
      </text>
    </archimedes>