Galilei, Galileo, The systems of the world, 1661

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SALV. I come again to Ariſtotle, who having very well, and
Methodically begun his diſcourſe, but having a greater aim to
reſt at, and hit a marke, predefigned in his minde, then that to
which his method lead him, digreſſing from the purpoſe, he comes
to aſſert, as a thing known and manifeſt, that as to the motions
directly upwards or downwards, they naturally agree to Fire, and
Earth; and that therefore it is neceſſary, that beſides theſe bodies,
which are neer unto us, there muſt be in nature another, to which
the circular motion may agree: which ſhall be ſo much the more
excellent by how much the circular motion is more perfect, then the
ſtreight, but how much more perfect that is than this, he deter­
mines from the greatneſs of the circular lines perfection above the

right line; calling that perfect, and this imperfect; imperfect, be­
cauſe if infinite it wanteth a termination, and end: and if it be fi­
nite, there is yet ſomething beyond which it may be prolonged.
This is the baſis, ground work, and maſter-ſtone of all the Fabrick
of the Aristotelian World, upon which they ſuperſtruct all their
other properties, of neither heavy nor light, of ingenerable incor­
ruptible, exemption from all motions, ſome onely the local, &c.
And all theſe paſſions he affirmeth to be proper to a ſimple body
that is moved circularly; and the contrary qualities of gravity,
levity, corruptibility, &c.
he aſſigns to bodies naturally moveable
in a ſtreight line, for that if we have already diſcovered defects in
the foundation, we may rationally queſtion what ſoever may far­

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