Galilei, Galileo, The systems of the world, 1661

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The Earth speri­
cal by the conſpi­
ration of its parts
to its Centre.
The Sun more pro­
bably in the centre
of the Vniverſe,
than the Earth.
SIMPL. Certainly, if you in this manner deny not onely the
Principles of Sciences, but manifeſt Experience, and the Senſes
themſelves, you can never be convinced or removed from any
pinion which you once conceit, therefore I will chooſe rather to
be ſilent (for, contra negantes principia non eſt diſputandum)
than contend with you.
And inſiſting on the things alledged by
you even now (ſince you queſtion ſo much as whether grave move­
ables have a right motion or no) how can you ever rationally de­

ny, that the parts of the Earth; or, if you will, that ponderous
matters deſcend towards the Centre, with a right motion; when­
as, if from a very high Tower, whoſe walls are vcry upright and
perpendicular, you let them fall, they ſhall deſcend gliding and
ſliding by the Tower to the Earth, exactly in that very place
where a plummet would fall, being hanged by a line faſtned above,
juſt there, whence the ſaid weights were let fall?
is not this a
more than evident argument of the motions being right, and to­

wards the Centre?
In the ſecond place you call in doubt, whe­
ther the parts of the Earth are moved, as Ariſtotle affirms, to­
wards the Centre of the World; as if he had not rationally de­
monſtrated it by contrary motions, whilſt he thus argueth; The
motion of heavie bodies is contrary to that of the light: but the
motion of the light is manifeſt to be directly upwards, namely,
towards the circumference of the World, therefore the motion of
the heavie is directly towards the Centre of the World: and it

happens per accidens, that it be towards the centre of the Earth,
for that this ſtriveth to be united to that.
The ſeeking in the
next place, what a part of the Globe of the Sun or Moon would
do, were it ſeparated from its whole, is vanity; becauſe that there­

by that is ſought, which would be the conſequence of an impoſſi­
bility; in regard that, as Ariſtotle alſo demonſtrates, the cœleſtial
bodies are impaſſible, impenetrable, and infrangible; ſo that ſuch

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