Galilei, Galileo, The systems of the world, 1661

List of thumbnails

< >
1
1
2
2
3
3
4
4
5
5
6
6
7
7
8
8
9
9
10
10
< >
page |< < of 948 > >|
    <archimedes>
      <text>
        <front>
          <section>
            <pb xlink:href="065/01/006.jpg"/>
            <p type="main">
              <s>
                <emph type="italics"/>
              With all I conceived it very proper to expreſs theſe conceits by way of Dialogue, which, as not being
                <lb/>
              bound up to the riggid obſervance of Mathematical Laws, gives place alſo to Digreſsions that are
                <lb/>
              ſometimes no leſs curious than the principal Argument.
                <emph.end type="italics"/>
              </s>
            </p>
            <p type="main">
              <s>
                <emph type="italics"/>
              I chanced to be ſeveral years ſince, at ſeveral times, in the Stupendious Citty of
                <emph.end type="italics"/>
              Venice,
                <emph type="italics"/>
              where I
                <lb/>
              converſed with
                <emph.end type="italics"/>
              Signore Giovan Franceſco Sagredo
                <emph type="italics"/>
              of a Noble Extraction, and piercing wit. </s>
              <s>There
                <lb/>
              came thither from
                <emph.end type="italics"/>
              Florence
                <emph type="italics"/>
              at the ſame time
                <emph.end type="italics"/>
              Signore Filippo Salviati,
                <emph type="italics"/>
              whoſe leaſt glory was the Emi­
                <lb/>
              nence of his Blood, and Magnificence of his Eſtate: a ſublime Wit that fed not more hungerly upon
                <lb/>
              any pleaſure than on elevated Speculations. </s>
              <s>In the company of theſe two I often diſcourſed of theſe
                <lb/>
              matters before a certain Peripatetick Philoſopher who ſeemed to have no geater obſtacle in underſtand­
                <lb/>
              ing of the Truth, than the Fame he had acquired by Ariſtotelical Interpretations.
                <emph.end type="italics"/>
              </s>
            </p>
            <p type="main">
              <s>
                <emph type="italics"/>
              Now, ſeeing that inexorable Death hath deprived
                <emph.end type="italics"/>
              Venice
                <emph type="italics"/>
              and
                <emph.end type="italics"/>
              Florence
                <emph type="italics"/>
              of thoſe two great Lights in
                <lb/>
              the very Meridian of their years, I did reſolve, as far as my poor ability would permit, to perpetuate
                <lb/>
              their lives to their honour in theſe leaves, bringing them in as Interlocutors in the preſent Controverſy.
                <lb/>
              </s>
              <s>Nor ſhall the Honest Peripatetick want his place, to whom for his exceſsive affection to wards the Com­
                <lb/>
              mentaries of
                <emph.end type="italics"/>
              Simplicius,
                <emph type="italics"/>
              I thought fit, without mentioning his own Name, to leave that of the Author
                <lb/>
              he ſo much reſpected. </s>
              <s>Let thoſe two great Souls, ever venerable to my heart, pleaſe to accept this pu­
                <lb/>
              blick Monument of my never dying Love; and let the remembr ance of their Eloquence aſsiſt me in
                <lb/>
              delivering to Poſterity the Conſider ations that I have promiſed.
                <emph.end type="italics"/>
              </s>
            </p>
            <p type="main">
              <s>
                <emph type="italics"/>
              There caſually happened (as was uſuall) ſeveral diſcourſes at times between theſe Gentlemen, the
                <lb/>
              which had rather inflamed than ſatisfied in their wits the thirſt they had to be learning; whereupon
                <lb/>
              they took a diſcreet reſolution to meet together for certain dayes, in which all other buſineſs ſet aſide,
                <lb/>
              they might betake themſelves more methodically to contemplate the Wonders of God in Heaven, and in
                <lb/>
              the Earth: the place appointed for their meeting being in the Palace of the Noble
                <emph.end type="italics"/>
              Sagredo,
                <emph type="italics"/>
              after the
                <lb/>
              due, but very ſhort complements
                <emph.end type="italics"/>
              ; Signore Salviati
                <emph type="italics"/>
              began in this manner.
                <emph.end type="italics"/>
              </s>
            </p>
          </section>
        </front>
        <body>
          <chap/>
        </body>
      </text>
    </archimedes>