Galilei, Galileo, The systems of the world, 1661

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    <archimedes>
      <text>
        <body>
          <chap>
            <p type="main">
              <s>
                <pb xlink:href="065/01/008.jpg" pagenum="2"/>
              ſible: Since that it is neceſſary to introduce in Nature, ſubſtances
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              different betwixt themſelves, that is, the Cœleſtial, and Elementa­
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              ry; that impaſſible and immortal, this alterable and corruptible.
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              </s>
              <s>Which argument
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              Ariſtotle
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              handleth in his book
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              De Cœlo,
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              inſinu­
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              ating it firſt, by ſome diſcourſes dependent on certain general aſ­
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              ſumptions, and afterwards confirming it with experiments and per­
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              ticular demonſtrations: following the ſame method, I will pro­
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              pound, and freely ſpeak my judgement, ſubmitting my ſelf to
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              your cenſure, and particularly to
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              Simplicius,
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              a Stout Champion
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              and contender for the
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              Ariſtotelian
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              Doctrine.
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              </s>
            </p>
            <p type="margin">
              <s>
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              Copernicus
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              repu­
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              teth the earth œ
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              Globe like to a Pla­
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              net.
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              </s>
            </p>
            <p type="margin">
              <s>
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                <emph type="italics"/>
              Cœleſtial ſubſtan­
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              ces that are inalte­
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              rable, and Elemen­
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              tary that be alte­
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              rable, are neceſſary
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              in the opinion of
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              Ariſtotle.</s>
            </p>
            <p type="margin">
              <s>
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              Ariſtotle
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              maketh
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              the World perfect,
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              becauſe it hath the
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              threefold demenſi­
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              on.
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              </s>
            </p>
            <p type="main">
              <s>And the firſt Step of the
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              Peripatetick
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              arguments is that, where
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              riſtotle
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              proveth the integrity and perfection of the World, telling
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              us, that it is not a ſimple line, nor a bare ſuperficies, but a body
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              adorned with Longitude, Latitude, and Profundity; and becauſe
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              there are no more dimenſions but theſe three; The World having
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              them, hath all, and having all, is to be concluded perfect. </s>
              <s>And
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              again, that by ſimple length, that magnitude is conſtituted, which
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              is called a Line, to which adding breadth, there is framed the Su­
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              perficies, and yet further adding the altitude or profoundity, there
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              reſults the Body, and after theſe three dimenſions there is no
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              paſſing farther, ſo that in theſe three the integrity, and to ſo ſpeak,
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              totality is terminated, which I might but with juſtice have requi­
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              red
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              Ariſtotle
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              to have proved to me by neceſſary conſequences, the
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              rather in regard he was able to do it very plainly, and ſpeedily.</s>
            </p>
            <p type="main">
              <s>SIMPL. </s>
              <s>What ſay you to the excellent demonſtrations in the </s>
            </p>
            <p type="main">
              <s>
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              2. 3. and 4. Texts, after the definition of
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              Continual
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              ? </s>
              <s>have you it
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              not firſt there proved, that there is no more but three dimenſions,
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              for that thoſe three are all things, and that they are every where?
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              </s>
              <s>And is not this confirmed by the Doctrine and Authority of the
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                <lb/>
                <emph type="italics"/>
              Pythagorians,
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              who ſay that all things are determined by three, be­
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              ginning, middle, and end, which is the number of All? </s>
              <s>And where
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              leave you that reaſon, namely, that as it were by the law of Na­
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              ture, this number is uſed in the ſacrifices of the Gods? </s>
              <s>And why
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              being ſo dictated by nature, do we atribute to thoſe things that
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              are three, and not to leſſe, the title of all? </s>
              <s>why of two is it ſaid
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              both, and not all, unleſs they be three? </s>
              <s>And all this Doctrine you
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              have in the ſecond Text. </s>
              <s>Afterwards in the third,
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              Ad pleniorem
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                <lb/>
                <emph type="italics"/>
              ſcientiam,
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              we read that
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              All,
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              the
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              Whole,
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              and
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              Perfect,
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              are formally
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              one and the ſame; and that therefore onely the
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              Body,
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              amongſt
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              magnitudes is perfect: becauſe it is determined by three, which is
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              All, and being diviſible three manner of waies, it is every way di­
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              viſible; but of the others, ſome are dividible in one manner, and
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              ſome in two, becauſe according to the number aſſixed, they have
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              their diviſion and continuity, and thus one magnitude is continu­
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              ate one way, another two, a third, namely the Body, every way. </s>
            </p>
          </chap>
        </body>
      </text>
    </archimedes>