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Historical Sources on Spatial Concepts

255 resource(s) found.

Works included:
Eutocii Ascalonitae in Archimedis libros sphaera et cylindro, atque alios quosdam, Commentaria, nunc primum et Graece et Latine in lucem edita / Eutocius Ascalonius
Source information
Permanent URI:http://echo.mpiwg-berlin.mpg.de/MPIWG:XS0HGPGX
Accessere
I. Breuis introductio ad geographiam.
II. Apparatus ad mathematicarum studium.
III. Echometria, idest Geometrica tractatio de Echo.
IV. Nouum instrumentum ad Horologia
Source information
We present the Latin text of the DMA from Favaro's edition in the standard ECHO environment, which provides morphological links to dictionaries as well as morphological search capabilities.
Source information
We present a complete collection of images of the manuscript containing the DMA, provided by the Bibliotheca Nazionale in Florence (MS Gal. 71; 282 images total). We are currently working on correlating these images with the Latin and English versions of the DMA text.
Source information
Permanent URI:http://echo.mpiwg-berlin.mpg.de/MPIWG:YPUW2BW7
Works included:
Methode der kleinsten Quadrate : [Vorlesungsmitschrift] / vorgetragen von ... Gauss, Göttingen WS 1848/9; G. Stisser
Source information
Permanent URI:http://echo.mpiwg-berlin.mpg.de/MPIWG:0RE3TSV0
Works included:
I. Pars, Quâ facillima ac expeditissima Methodus omne id, quod ad Architecturam attinet, optica ratone delineandi exhibetur =
Erster Theil, Worinnen gezeiget wird, wie man auf das allergeschwindest- und leichteste alles, was zur Architectur und Bau-Kunst gehöret, ins Perspectiv bringen solle
II. Pars, Quâ porrò expeditissima Mehtodus omnia, quae ad Architecturam pertinent, optica ratione delineandi exhibetur =
Zweyter Theil, Worinn die allerleichteste Manier, wie man was zur Bau-Kunst gehörig, ins Perspectiv bringen solle berichtet wird
Source information
Permanent URI:http://echo.mpiwg-berlin.mpg.de/MPIWG:9PE7BUKS
WORKS INCLUDED:
Erster Theil, Worinnen gezeiget wird wie man alles was in der Architectur zu finden ist, auf das geschwindeste in das Perspectiv bringen und das Haupt-Fundament der edlen Mahleren auf das gewisseste erlernen soll;
Zweyter Theil, Worinnen angewiesen wird, wie alles was von archtectonischer Invention durch die Perspectiv, als das Haupt-Fundament der edlen Mahleren, correct aufgezeichnet worden, mit dem behörigen Sonnen-Tag- und Flammen-Licht, zur natürlichen Vollkommenheit zu bringen...
Source information
Permanent URI:http://echo.mpiwg-berlin.mpg.de/MPIWG:8BQXPKVT
Further information:
Access by diagram
 

This diagram shows a group of folio pages. The connectedness of the notes on different pages is indicated by two kinds of arrows. Drawn-out arrows indicate Harriot's own pagination, dashed arrows indicate the transfer of a result. The small selection of folios currently presented will in the future be enlarged in order to provide a comprehensive overview on Harriot's notes on motion.

This diagram is the result of scholarly work.
Please cite as:"Matthias Schemmel: A Diagram on Thomas Harriot's Notes on Motion in a Medium, 2003. http://echo.mpiwg-berlin.mpg.de/content/scientific_revolution/harriot/Harriot/medium.html".

Albert Einstein - Engineer of the Universe (virtual exhibition)

The exhibition "Albert Einstein – Chief Engineer of the Universe", organized by the Max Planck Society, was presented from 16 May until 30 September 2005 in the Kronprinzenpalais, Unter den Linden in Berlin.
The exhibition aimed to convey to a wide audience the scientific revolution triggered by Einstein, as well as Einstein the person, probably the most famous scientist of the 20th century and distunguished person of contemporary history.
It was conceptualized by the Max Planck Institute for the History of Science under the leadership of Professor Jürgen Renn.

Albert Einstein's Articles in "Annalen der Physik"

This collection presents Einstein's 49 contributions to Annalen der Physik. The collection includes the pathbreaking papers of Einstein's annus mirabilis 1905, which changed our understanding of space, time, matter, and radiation.

Archives Henri Poincaré

Between 1880 and 1930 mathematical and theoretical physics underwent substantial changes. on the one hand linked to the emergence of several fields of mathematics (group theory, algebraic geometry, topology) and on the other hand the disintegration of the Newtonian physics under the effect of the discovery of the electromagnetic waves, the X-rays, the radioactivity, the electrons, and the quantum energy. It is specific to the French scientist Henri Poincaré (1854-1912) to have participated in all these transformations. At the age of 26, Poincaré discovered the theory of Fuchsian functions, thanks to which one could resolve any linear differential equation with algebraic coefficients. The impact of this discovery was to make him corresponding member of the German Academies, even before being nominated for a chair of mathematical physics at the Faculty of Sciences and elected as member of the Institute. Throughout these positions, Poincaré influenced French mathematical research for more than 25 years while pursuing his teaching and research activities. At his death in 1912, he had published some 600 articles on pure mathematics, geometry, celestial mechanics, physics, and philosophy of science.
With the installation of an infrastructure that facilitates the electronic publication of source texts it became possible launch an alternative representation of Galileo's notes on motion within the ECHO framework. Even though this ECHO representation of the manuscript does not provide some of the advanced tools of the earlier representation it benefits from the standard tools provided by the ECHO infrastructure such as for instance morphological analysis or annotation facilities.
Source information
Until recently the only English translation of the DMA was that of I. E. Drabkin, who translated only the first and fourth of the writings listed above (the essay and dialogue on motion). We present here, in the standard ECHO environment, a new and complete English translation by Raymond Fredette.
Source information

Lecture Notes taken by Walter Zabel

Walter Carl Ferdinand Zabel, born 1892 in Bromberg/Posen, studied from summer 1911 to summer 1912 in Breslau and from winter 1912 to summer 1914 in Göttingen. From 1914 to 1919 he joined the military service, but must have had time to hear a lecture of Einstein in the winter 1917/18 at the university of Berlin without being registered. From 1919 to 1920 he finished his studies in Halle and worked afterwards until his retirement in 1957 as a teacher at a gymnasium in Berlin-Tempelhof. He died in 1968 leaving behind two carefully written volumes with lecture notes.

The first volume contains essentially a comprehensive lecture of David Hilbert on the foundations of mathematics. As an appendix to this lecture, Zabel copied a publication of Minkowski's famous 1908 lecture on space and time. The second volume begins with another lecture of Hilbert, a lecture on analytical mechanics at the university of Göttingen in winter 1913/14. The volume continues after the interruption of Zabel's studies with a lecture of Grammel on hydrodynamics at the university of Halle in summer 1919. The volumes ends with notes taken at Einstein's lecture on statistical mechanics at the university of Berlin in Winter 1917/18. In contrast to other lecture notes, these notes are written on bad quality paper and incompletely worked out, obviously as a consequence of the war. Zabel kept, however, stenographic notes of the parts missing at the end.

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Notebooks of Einstein and Minkowski in the Jewish National & University Library

The Jewish National and University Library keeps some of the most important sources documenting the emergence of modern physics, among them notebooks of Albert Einstein and Hermann Minkowski.

Scientific Philosophy and Modern Physics: Albert Einstein and Moritz Schlick

The Einstein-Schlick-correspondence reveals the fruitful relationship between the scientific philosophy and modern physics within the period from the 1910s to the 1930s. The letters concern the philosophical consequences with respect to the rising of the relativity and the quantum theory. Furthermore the correspondence illustrates the intellectual and socio-cultural back-ground that was decisive for the relativity and the quantum revolution to take place.

Scientific Philosophy and Modern Physics: Hans Reichenbach and Moritz Schlick, Correspondence 1920-22

The extensive correspondence between Hans Reichenbach and Moritz Schlick is one of the most important sources of the origin and the development of the scientific philosophy in Europe in the first half of the 20th century. Both Schlick and Reichenbach were very much involved in the philosophical debates concerning the relativity and the quantum revolution. Most significantly, the correspondence deals with the concepts of space, time, natural law, probability and causality and its fundamental changes due to modern physics.

Scientific Philosophy and Modern Physics: Hans Reichenbach and Moritz Schlick, Correspondence 1923/24

Correspondence 1923/24
The extensive correspondence between Hans Reichenbach and Moritz Schlick is one of the most important sources of the origin and the development of the scientific philosophy in Europe in the first half of the 20th century. Both Schlick and Reichenbach were very much involved in the philosophical debates concerning the relativity and the quantum revolution. Most significantly, the correspondence deals with the concepts of space, time, natural law, probability and causality and its fundamental changes due to modern physics.

The Ernst Gehrcke Papers

The Max Planck Institute for the History of Science has recently acquired what has been preserved of the Ernst Gehrcke Papers. Parts of these papers will be digitized and made accessible.

From 1902 until 1946, Gehrcke, an experimentalist and specialist in optics, was employed at the Physikalisch-Technische Reichsanstalt, and became director of the department of optics in 1926. Ernst Gehrcke is known as a fervent critic of Einstein and a leading figure among Einstein's German opponents. The Ernst Gehrcke Papers contain correspondence with the physicists Philipp Lenard, Stjepan Mohorovicic, Ludwig Glaser, Hermann Fricke, Johannes Stark, Otto Lummer and the philosophers Oskar Kraus, Melchior Palagyi, Leonore Frobenius-Kühn, and others; numerous offprints and booklets; some drafts and manuscripts by Gehrcke, for example, Über das Uhrenparadoxon in der Relativitätstheorie and Die erkenntnistheoretischen Grundlagen der verschiedenen physikalischen Relativitätstheorien, and all the parts which were rescued from the Gehrcke newspaper article collection.

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