Wilkins, John, A discovery of a new world : or a discourse tending to prove, that 'tis probable there may be another Habitable World in the Moon ; with a discourse concerning the Probability of a Passage thither; unto which is added, a discourse concerning a New Planet, tending to prove, that 'tis probable our earth is one of the Planets

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That the Moon may be a World.
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              <pb o="75" file="0087" n="87" rhead="That the Moon may be a World."/>
            ny of our Prodigies come to paſs, and the
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            People are willing to believe any thing, which
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            they may relate to others as a very ſtrange and
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            wonderful Event. </s>
            <s xml:space="preserve">I doubt not but the Trojan
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            Palladium, the Roman Minerva, and our La-
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            dies Church at Loretto, with many ſacred Re-
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            liques preſerv'd by the Papiſts might drop
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            from the Moon as well as any of theſe.</s>
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            <note position="left" xlink:label="note-0086-01" xlink:href="note-0086-01a" xml:space="preserve">Vide Guli.
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            Nubrigenſ.
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            de rebus.
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            Anglicæ.
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            lib. 1.</note>
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            <s xml:space="preserve">But it may be again Objected, ſuppoſe there
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            were a Bullet ſhot up in that World, would
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            not the Moon run away from it; </s>
            <s xml:space="preserve">before it
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            could fall down, ſince the Motion of her Bo-
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            dy (being every day round our Earth) is far
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            ſwifter than the other, and ſo the Bullet muſt
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            be left behind, and at length fall down to us?
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            </s>
            <s xml:space="preserve">To this I anſwer.</s>
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          <p>
            <s xml:space="preserve">1. </s>
            <s xml:space="preserve">If a Bullet could be ſhot ſo far till it
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            it came to the Circumference of thoſe things
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            which belong to our Centre, then it would
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            fall down to us.</s>
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          </p>
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            <s xml:space="preserve">2. </s>
            <s xml:space="preserve">Though there were ſome Heavy Body
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            a great Height in that Air, yet would the Mo-
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            tion of that Magnetical Globe to which it did
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            belong by an attractive Virtue, ſtill hold it
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            within its convenient diſtance, whether their
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            Earth moved or ſtood ſtill, yet would the
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            ſame Violence caſt a Body from it equally far.
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            </s>
            <s xml:space="preserve">That I may the plainer expreſs my meaning,
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            I will ſet down this Diagram.</s>
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