Wilkins, John, A discovery of a new world : or a discourse tending to prove, that 'tis probable there may be another Habitable World in the Moon ; with a discourse concerning the Probability of a Passage thither; unto which is added, a discourse concerning a New Planet, tending to prove, that 'tis probable our earth is one of the Planets

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That the earth may be a Planet
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              <pb o="2" file="0182" n="182" rhead="That the earth may be a Planet"/>
            and Opinion of others, and then afterwards
              <lb/>
            to deſcend unto the Reaſons that may be
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            drawn from the Nature and Eſſence of the
              <lb/>
            things themſelves: </s>
            <s xml:space="preserve">Becauſe theſe inartificial
              <lb/>
            Arguments (as the Logicians call them) do
              <lb/>
            not carry with them any clear and convin-
              <lb/>
            cing evidence; </s>
            <s xml:space="preserve">and therefore ſhould come
              <lb/>
            after thoſe that are of more neceſſary depen-
              <lb/>
            dance, as ſerving rather to confirm, than re-
              <lb/>
            ſolve the Judgment.</s>
            <s xml:space="preserve"/>
          </p>
          <p>
            <s xml:space="preserve">But yet, ſo it is, that in thoſe points which
              <lb/>
            are beſides the common Opinion, Men are
              <lb/>
            carried away at the firſt by the general cry,
              <lb/>
            and ſeldom or never come ſo far as to ex-
              <lb/>
            amine the reaſons that may be urged for
              <lb/>
            them. </s>
            <s xml:space="preserve">And therefore, ſince it is the purpoſe
              <lb/>
            of this diſcourſe to remove thoſe prejudices
              <lb/>
            which may hinder our Judgment in the like
              <lb/>
            caſe, ’tis requiſit that in the firſt place there
              <lb/>
            be ſome ſatisfaction given to thoſe Argu-
              <lb/>
            ments that may be taken from the Authori-
              <lb/>
            ty of others.</s>
            <s xml:space="preserve"/>
          </p>
          <p>
            <s xml:space="preserve">Which Arguments are inſiſted on by our
              <lb/>
            adverſaries with much heat and violence.</s>
            <s xml:space="preserve"/>
          </p>
          <p>
            <s xml:space="preserve">What (ſay they) ſhall an upſtart Novel-
              <lb/>
            ty thruſt out ſuch a Truth as hath paſſed by
              <lb/>
            ſucceſſive Tradition through all Ages of the
              <lb/>
            World? </s>
            <s xml:space="preserve">And hath been generally entertain-
              <lb/>
            ed, not only in the Opinion of the vulgar,
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              <anchor type="note" xlink:label="note-0182-01a" xlink:href="note-0182-01"/>
            but alſo of the greateſt Philoſophers and
              <lb/>
            moſt Learned Men? </s>
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              <anchor type="note" xlink:href="" symbol="*"/>
            Shall we think thatamongſt the multitude of thoſe who in ſeve-
              <lb/>
            ral times have been eminent for new inven-
              <lb/>
            tions and ſtrange diſcoveries, there was none </s>
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