Wilkins, John, A discovery of a new world : or a discourse tending to prove, that 'tis probable there may be another Habitable World in the Moon ; with a discourse concerning the Probability of a Passage thither; unto which is added, a discourse concerning a New Planet, tending to prove, that 'tis probable our earth is one of the Planets

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That the Earth may be a Planet.
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              <pb o="130" file="0310" n="310" rhead="That the Earth may be a Planet."/>
            Birds did ſtand ſtill, by a direct aiming at
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            their Bodies, and following of their flight
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            by the motion of the Piece; </s>
            <s xml:space="preserve">till at length,
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            having got a perfect aim, they diſcharge,
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            and do hit altogether as ſurely, as if the
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            Birds were ſitting upon a Tree. </s>
            <s xml:space="preserve">From
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            whence we may obſerve, that the motion of
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            the Piece, as in our aiming, it is made to
              <lb/>
            follow the Birds in their flight, (though it
              <lb/>
            be but ſlow) yet is communicated to the
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            Bullet in the Air.</s>
            <s xml:space="preserve"/>
          </p>
          <p>
            <s xml:space="preserve">But here it may ſeem very diſficult to give
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            any reaſon, according to thoſe grounds con-
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            cerning the flight of Birds; </s>
            <s xml:space="preserve">which being a-
              <lb/>
            nimated, have a liberty to fly here or there,
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            to tarry, for a good ſpace of time, in the
              <lb/>
            open Air; </s>
            <s xml:space="preserve">and ſo ’tis not eaſy to conceive
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            what means there is, by which they ſhould
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            participate of the Earth's Diurnal Revolu-
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            tion.</s>
            <s xml:space="preserve"/>
          </p>
          <p>
            <s xml:space="preserve">To this Gallilæus anſwers, That the mo-
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            tion of the Air, as it does turn about the
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            Clouds, ſo doth it alſo carry with it the
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            Birds, together with ſuch other like things
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            that are in it. </s>
            <s xml:space="preserve">For if ſome violent Wind be
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            able to drive, with ſuch ſwiftneſs, a full
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            laden Ship, to throw down Towers, to turn
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            up Trees, and the like; </s>
            <s xml:space="preserve">much more then
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            may the Diurnal Motion of the Air (which
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            does ſo far exceed in ſwiftneſs the moſt tem-
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            peſtuous Wind) be able to carry with it the
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            Bodies of Birds.</s>
            <s xml:space="preserve"/>
          </p>
          <p>
            <s xml:space="preserve">But if all things be turned about by this
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              <anchor type="note" xlink:label="note-0310-01a" xlink:href="note-0310-01"/>
            Revolution, then it ſhould ſeem there is no</s>
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