Wilkins, John, A discovery of a new world : or a discourse tending to prove, that 'tis probable there may be another Habitable World in the Moon ; with a discourse concerning the Probability of a Passage thither; unto which is added, a discourse concerning a New Planet, tending to prove, that 'tis probable our earth is one of the Planets

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That the Earth may be a Planet.
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        <div type="section" level="1" n="63">
          <pb o="124" file="0304" n="304" rhead="That the Earth may be a Planet."/>
          <p>
            <s xml:space="preserve">If an equal force will caſt an heavy Bo-
              <lb/>
            dy but at an equal diſtance, whether or no
              <lb/>
            it move with, or againſt the motion of the
              <lb/>
            Ship; </s>
            <s xml:space="preserve">then may we eaſily conceive, that an
              <lb/>
            Arrow, or B@llet, being ſhot with the ſame
              <lb/>
            violence, will paſs but the ſame ſpace on the
              <lb/>
            Earth, whether or no it be ſhot towards the
              <lb/>
            Eaſt or Weſt.</s>
            <s xml:space="preserve"/>
          </p>
          <p>
            <s xml:space="preserve">If a heavy Body, while the Ship does move,
              <lb/>
            will fall down in a ſtreight Line; </s>
            <s xml:space="preserve">then it is
              <lb/>
            not the Revol@tion of our Earth that can
              <lb/>
            hinder a perpendicular deſcent.</s>
            <s xml:space="preserve"/>
          </p>
          <p>
            <s xml:space="preserve">If a Man, leaping up in a Ship, may a-
              <lb/>
            bide in the Air one ſecond ſcruple of an hour,
              <lb/>
            and yet this Ship, in its greateſt ſwiftneſs,
              <lb/>
            not withdraw it ſelf fifteen foot; </s>
            <s xml:space="preserve">then will
              <lb/>
            not the Earth, in that ſpace, go from him
              <lb/>
            almoſt a quarter of a mile.</s>
            <s xml:space="preserve"/>
          </p>
          <p>
            <s xml:space="preserve">But againſt this, ’tis Objected, That the
              <lb/>
              <anchor type="note" xlink:label="note-0304-01a" xlink:href="note-0304-01"/>
            Earth has the ſimilitude of an open Ship, and
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            not of any Room that is cloſe. </s>
            <s xml:space="preserve">And tho it
              <lb/>
            be true, that when the Roof and the Walls
              <lb/>
            do all move together, the Air which is in-
              <lb/>
            cluded betwixt them, muſt be carried along
              <lb/>
            by the ſame motion; </s>
            <s xml:space="preserve">yet it is not ſo with
              <lb/>
            the Earth, becauſe that hath not any ſuch
              <lb/>
            Walls or Roof, wherein it may contain and
              <lb/>
            carry along with it the Medium. </s>
            <s xml:space="preserve">And there-
              <lb/>
            fore Experience will rather argue againſt
              <lb/>
            this fuppoſed Revolution. </s>
            <s xml:space="preserve">Thus ’tis ob-
              <lb/>
            ferved, that a Stone being let fall from the
              <lb/>
            Maſt of a Ship, that moves ſwiftly, will not
              <lb/>
            deſcend to the ſame point, as if the Ship
              <lb/>
            did ſtand ſtill. </s>
            <s xml:space="preserve">From whence it will follow,</s>
          </p>
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