Wilkins, John, A discovery of a new world : or a discourse tending to prove, that 'tis probable there may be another Habitable World in the Moon ; with a discourse concerning the Probability of a Passage thither; unto which is added, a discourse concerning a New Planet, tending to prove, that 'tis probable our earth is one of the Planets

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              <pb o="142" file="0322" n="322" rhead="That the Earth may be a Planct."/>
            the Equator, in one beating of the Pulſe, muſt
              <lb/>
            move 2528 of theſe miles.</s>
            <s xml:id="echoid-s4863" xml:space="preserve"/>
          </p>
          <p>
            <s xml:id="echoid-s4864" xml:space="preserve">’Tis the Affertion of Clavius, that
              <note symbol="" position="left" xlink:label="note-0322-01" xlink:href="note-0322-01a" xml:space="preserve">Commen.
                <lb/>
              in prim.
                <lb/>
              cap.Sphær.</note>
            the diſtance of the Orbs, and ſo conſe-
              <lb/>
            quently their ſwiftneſs, ſeem to be altoge-
              <lb/>
            ther incredible; </s>
            <s xml:id="echoid-s4865" xml:space="preserve">yet it is rather far greater
              <lb/>
            in it ſelf, than Aſtronomers uſually ſuppoſe
              <lb/>
            it; </s>
            <s xml:id="echoid-s4866" xml:space="preserve">and yet (ſaith he) according to the
              <lb/>
            common Grounds, every Star in the Equa-
              <lb/>
            tor, muſt move 42398437 {1/2} miles in an hour.
              <lb/>
            </s>
            <s xml:id="echoid-s4867" xml:space="preserve">And though a Man ſhould conſtantly travel
              <lb/>
            40 miles a day, yet he would not be able to
              <lb/>
            go ſo far as a Star does in one hour, under
              <lb/>
            2904 Years: </s>
            <s xml:id="echoid-s4868" xml:space="preserve">Or if we will ſuppoſe an Ar-
              <lb/>
            row to be of the ſame ſwiftneſs, then muſt
              <lb/>
            it compaſs this great Globe of Earth and
              <lb/>
            Water 1884 times in an hour. </s>
            <s xml:id="echoid-s4869" xml:space="preserve">And a Bird
              <lb/>
            that could but fly as faſt, might go round
              <lb/>
            the World ſeven times in that ſpace, whilſt
              <lb/>
            one could ſay, Ave Maria, gratia plena, Do-
              <lb/>
            minus tecum.</s>
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          </p>
          <p>
            <s xml:id="echoid-s4871" xml:space="preserve">Which though it be a pretty round pace,
              <lb/>
            yet you muſt conceive that all this is ſpoken
              <lb/>
            only of the eighth Sphere; </s>
            <s xml:id="echoid-s4872" xml:space="preserve">and ſo being
              <lb/>
            compared to the ſwiftneſs of the Primum
              <lb/>
            Mobile, is but a ſlow and heavy Motion.</s>
            <s xml:id="echoid-s4873" xml:space="preserve"/>
          </p>
          <p>
            <s xml:id="echoid-s4874" xml:space="preserve">For (ſaith the ſame Author) the thick-
              <lb/>
            neſs of each Orb is equal to the diſtance of
              <lb/>
            its concave Superſicies from the Centre of
              <lb/>
            the Earth. </s>
            <s xml:id="echoid-s4875" xml:space="preserve">Thus the Orb of the Moon does
              <lb/>
            contain as much ſpace in its thicknefs, as
              <lb/>
            there is betwixt the neareſt part of that
              <lb/>
            and the Centre. </s>
            <s xml:id="echoid-s4876" xml:space="preserve">Thus alſo the eight </s>
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