Wilkins, John, A discovery of a new world : or a discourse tending to prove, that 'tis probable there may be another Habitable World in the Moon ; with a discourse concerning the Probability of a Passage thither; unto which is added, a discourse concerning a New Planet, tending to prove, that 'tis probable our earth is one of the Planets

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That the Eartb may be a Planet.
ſtand it: ſince he puts it in the front of his
other Arguments, as being of ſtrength and
ſubtilty enough to be a Leader unto all the
reſt;
and yet in the moſt likely ſenſe of it,
’tis ſo extreamly ſimple to be preſſed in a
Controverſy, that every freſh Man would
laugh at it.
The words of it are theſe:
Quod minimum eſt in circulo debet eſſe centrum
illius, at Terr a longè minor eſt Sole, &
Æqui-
noctialis Terreſtris eſt omnium in Cælo circulus
minimus, ergo, &
c.
By the ſame reaſon, it would rather fol-
low, that the Moon, or Mercury, were in the
Centre, ſince both theſe are leſs than the
Earth.
And then, whereas he ſays, that the
Equinoctial of the Earth, is the leaſt Circle
in the Heavens, ’tis neigher true nor perti-
nent, and would make one ſuſpect, that he
who ſhould urge ſuch an Argument, did
ſcarce underſtand any thing in Aſtronomy.
There are many other Objections like un-
to this, not worth the citing:
The chief of
all have been already anſwered;
by which
you may diſcern, that there is not any ſuch
great neceſſity, as our Adverſaries pretend,
why the Earth ſhould be ſcituated in the
midſt of the Univerſe.

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