Wilkins, John, A discovery of a new world : or a discourse tending to prove, that 'tis probable there may be another Habitable World in the Moon ; with a discourse concerning the Probability of a Passage thither; unto which is added, a discourse concerning a New Planet, tending to prove, that 'tis probable our earth is one of the Planets

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That the Earth may be a Planet.
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          <p>
            <s xml:space="preserve">
              <pb o="116" file="0296" n="296" rhead="That the Earth may be a Planet."/>
            the Earth with a motive Faculty anſwerable
              <lb/>
            to its greatneſs. </s>
            <s xml:space="preserve">Or if this may make the
              <lb/>
            Earth incapable of ſo ſwift a motion as is
              <lb/>
            ſuppoſed, much more then will the Heavens
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            be diſabled for that greater ſwiftneſs which
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            is imagined in them. </s>
            <s xml:space="preserve">I might add, the Globe
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            of the Sun, and Jupiter, are obſerved to
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            move about their own Centres; </s>
            <s xml:space="preserve">and there-
              <lb/>
            fore the Earth, which is far leſs than either
              <lb/>
            of them, is not, by reaſon of its too great
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            magnitude, made unfit for ſuch a Revoluti-
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            on. </s>
            <s xml:space="preserve">Thirdly, As for the ſwiftneſs of the
              <lb/>
            Earth's Courſe, it does not exceed (all
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            Circumſtances well conſidered) the celeri-
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            ty of ſome other Motions, with which we
              <lb/>
            are acquainted; </s>
            <s xml:space="preserve">as that of the Clouds,
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            when driven by a tempeſtuous Wind; </s>
            <s xml:space="preserve">that
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            of a Bullet ſhot from a Canon, which in the
              <lb/>
              <anchor type="note" xlink:label="note-0296-01a" xlink:href="note-0296-01"/>
            ſpace of a minute flies four miles. </s>
            <s xml:space="preserve">Or, as
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            another hath obſerved, in the ſecond ſcru-
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            ple of an hour, it may paſs the fifteenth
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              <anchor type="note" xlink:label="note-0296-02a" xlink:href="note-0296-02"/>
            part of a German mile: </s>
            <s xml:space="preserve">Than which, there
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            is not any Point in the Earth's Equinoctial
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            that moves faſter; </s>
            <s xml:space="preserve">and though a Bullet be
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            much ſlower in moving a greater diſtance,
              <lb/>
            yet for ſo little a ſpace, while the force of
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            the Powder is moſt freſh and powerful, it
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            does equal the ſwiftneſs of the Earth. </s>
            <s xml:space="preserve">And
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            yet,</s>
          </p>
          <div type="float" level="2" n="6">
            <note position="left" xlink:label="note-0296-01" xlink:href="note-0296-01a" xml:space="preserve">Meſlin
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            prafat. ad
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            Narrat.
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            Rhet.</note>
            <note position="left" xlink:label="note-0296-02" xlink:href="note-0296-02a" xml:space="preserve">Fromond.
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            Veſta.
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            tract. 1.
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            cap. 3.</note>
          </div>
          <p>
            <s xml:space="preserve">1. </s>
            <s xml:space="preserve">A Bullet, or Cloud, is carried in its
              <lb/>
            whole Body, being fain to break its way
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            through the Air round about it: </s>
            <s xml:space="preserve">but
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            now the Earth (in reſpect of this firſt Mo-
              <lb/>
            tion) does remain ſtill in the ſame ſcitu-</s>
          </p>
        </div>
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