Wilkins, John, A discovery of a new world : or a discourse tending to prove, that 'tis probable there may be another Habitable World in the Moon ; with a discourse concerning the Probability of a Passage thither; unto which is added, a discourse concerning a New Planet, tending to prove, that 'tis probable our earth is one of the Planets

Page concordance

< >
Scan Original
281 101
282 102
283 103
284 104
285 105
286 106
287 107
288 108
289 109
290 110
291 111
292 112
293 113
294 114
295 115
296 116
297 117
298 118
299 119
300 120
301 121
302 122
303 123
304 124
305 125
306 126
307 127
308 128
309 129
310 130
< >
page |< < (115) of 370 > >|
That the Earth may be a Planet.
    <echo version="1.0RC">
      <text xml:lang="en" type="free">
        <div type="section" level="1" n="63">
          <p>
            <s xml:space="preserve">
              <pb o="115" file="0295" n="295" rhead="That the Earth may be a Planet."/>
            a Loadſtone, in reſpect of its matter and
              <lb/>
            condenſity, naturally tends downward; </s>
            <s xml:space="preserve">yet
              <lb/>
            this does not hinder, but that in reſpect of
              <lb/>
            ſome other qualities, as its deſire of union
              <lb/>
            and coition to another Loadſtone, it may
              <lb/>
            alſo naturally move upwards. </s>
            <s xml:space="preserve">From
              <lb/>
            whence it will follow, that the ſame Ele-
              <lb/>
            mentary Body, may have divers natural
              <lb/>
            Motions.</s>
            <s xml:space="preserve"/>
          </p>
          <p>
            <s xml:space="preserve">5. </s>
            <s xml:space="preserve">The gravity and magnitude of this
              <lb/>
            Earthy Globe, do make it altogether unfit
              <lb/>
            for ſo ſwift a Motion.</s>
            <s xml:space="preserve"/>
          </p>
          <p>
            <s xml:space="preserve">I anſwer: </s>
            <s xml:space="preserve">Firſt, Heavineſs can only be
              <lb/>
            applied unto thoſe Bodies which are out of
              <lb/>
            their proper places, or unto ſuch parts as
              <lb/>
            are ſevered from the whole to which they
              <lb/>
            belong. </s>
            <s xml:space="preserve">And therefore the Globe of Earth,
              <lb/>
            conſidered as whole, and in its right place,
              <lb/>
            cannot truly be called heavy. </s>
            <s xml:space="preserve">I deny not,
              <lb/>
            but that there is in it, and ſo likewiſe in
              <lb/>
            the other Planets, an ineptitude to motion,
              <lb/>
            by reaſon of the matter and condenſity of
              <lb/>
            their Bodies: </s>
            <s xml:space="preserve">And ſo likewiſe there is, as
              <lb/>
            truly, (though not according to the ſame
              <lb/>
            degrees) in the leaſt particle of a material
              <lb/>
            condenſed Subſtance: </s>
            <s xml:space="preserve">ſo that this cannot
              <lb/>
            reaſonably be pretended as a juſt Impedi-
              <lb/>
            ment, why the Earth ſhould be incapable of
              <lb/>
            ſuch a Motion. </s>
            <s xml:space="preserve">Secondly, And though this
              <lb/>
            Globe be of ſo vaſt a magnitude, yet, as
              <lb/>
            Nature beſtows upon other Creatures (for
              <lb/>
            inſtance, an Eagle and a Fly) Spirits, and
              <lb/>
            motive Powers, proportionable to their ſe-
              <lb/>
            veral Bodies: </s>
            <s xml:space="preserve">ſo likewiſe may ſhe endow</s>
          </p>
        </div>
      </text>
    </echo>