Wilkins, John, A discovery of a new world : or a discourse tending to prove, that 'tis probable there may be another Habitable World in the Moon ; with a discourse concerning the Probability of a Passage thither; unto which is added, a discourse concerning a New Planet, tending to prove, that 'tis probable our earth is one of the Planets

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            <s xml:id="echoid-s4101" xml:space="preserve">
              <pb o="94" file="0274" n="274" rhead="That the Eartb may be a Planet."/>
            authority of others, Keplar tells us,
              <note position="left" xlink:label="note-0274-01" xlink:href="note-0274-01a" xml:space="preserve">* Aſtron.
                <lb/>
              Copern.
                <lb/>
              l.I. par.I.</note>
            the experience of skilful Men, that the bet-
              <lb/>
            ter the Perſpective is, by ſo much the lefs
              <lb/>
            will the fixed Stars appear through it, being
              <lb/>
            but as meer Points from which the Beams of
              <lb/>
            Light do diſperſe themſelves like Hairs. </s>
            <s xml:id="echoid-s4102" xml:space="preserve">And
              <lb/>
            ’tis commonly affirmed by others, that the
              <lb/>
            Dog-ſtar, which ſeems to be the biggeſt
              <lb/>
            Star amongſt thoſe of the firſt Magnitude,
              <lb/>
            does yet appear through this Glaſs, but as a
              <lb/>
            little Point no bigger than the fiftieth part
              <lb/>
            of Jupiter. </s>
            <s xml:id="echoid-s4103" xml:space="preserve">Hence it is, that though the
              <lb/>
            common Opinion hold the Stars of the firſt
              <lb/>
            Magnitude to be two Minutes in their Dia-
              <lb/>
            meter, and Tycho three; </s>
            <s xml:id="echoid-s4104" xml:space="preserve">yet
              <note symbol="" position="left" xlink:label="note-0274-02" xlink:href="note-0274-02a" xml:space="preserve">Syſtem.
                <lb/>
              mundi,
                <lb/>
              Coll.3.</note>
            who had been moſt verſed in the Experi-
              <lb/>
            ments of his own Perſpective, concludes them
              <lb/>
            to be but five Seconds.</s>
            <s xml:id="echoid-s4105" xml:space="preserve"/>
          </p>
          <p>
            <s xml:id="echoid-s4106" xml:space="preserve">2. </s>
            <s xml:id="echoid-s4107" xml:space="preserve">To the ſecond: </s>
            <s xml:id="echoid-s4108" xml:space="preserve">Firſt, we affirm the
              <lb/>
            fixed Stars to be of a vaſt Magnitude. </s>
            <s xml:id="echoid-s4109" xml:space="preserve">But
              <lb/>
            however, this Argument does not induce any
              <lb/>
            neceſſity that we ſhould conceive them ſo big
              <lb/>
            as the Earth's Orb. </s>
            <s xml:id="echoid-s4110" xml:space="preserve">For it might eaſily be
              <lb/>
            proved, that though a Star of the ſixth Mag-
              <lb/>
            nitude, were but equal in Diameter unto
              <lb/>
            the Sun, (which is far enough from the
              <lb/>
            greatneſs of the Earth's Orb) yet the
              <lb/>
            ftarry Heaven would be at ſuch a diſtance
              <lb/>
            from us, that the Earth's annual Motion
              <lb/>
            could not cauſe any difference in its appear-
              <lb/>
            ance.</s>
            <s xml:id="echoid-s4111" xml:space="preserve"/>
          </p>
          <p>
            <s xml:id="echoid-s4112" xml:space="preserve">Suppoſe the Diameter of the Sun to be a-
              <lb/>
              <note position="left" xlink:label="note-0274-03" xlink:href="note-0274-03a" xml:space="preserve">Vid Galil.
                <lb/>
              ibid.</note>
            bout half a Degree, as our Adverſaries
              <lb/>
            grant; </s>
            <s xml:id="echoid-s4113" xml:space="preserve">whereas a Star of the ſixth </s>
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