Wilkins, John, A discovery of a new world : or a discourse tending to prove, that 'tis probable there may be another Habitable World in the Moon ; with a discourse concerning the Probability of a Passage thither; unto which is added, a discourse concerning a New Planet, tending to prove, that 'tis probable our earth is one of the Planets

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That the Earth may be a Planet.
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              <pb o="115" file="0295" n="295" rhead="That the Earth may be a Planet."/>
            a Loadſtone, in reſpect of its matter and
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            condenſity, naturally tends downward; </s>
            <s xml:space="preserve">yet
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            this does not hinder, but that in reſpect of
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            ſome other qualities, as its deſire of union
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            and coition to another Loadſtone, it may
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            alſo naturally move upwards. </s>
            <s xml:space="preserve">From
              <lb/>
            whence it will follow, that the ſame Ele-
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            mentary Body, may have divers natural
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            Motions.</s>
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          </p>
          <p>
            <s xml:space="preserve">5. </s>
            <s xml:space="preserve">The gravity and magnitude of this
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            Earthy Globe, do make it altogether unfit
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            for ſo ſwift a Motion.</s>
            <s xml:space="preserve"/>
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          <p>
            <s xml:space="preserve">I anſwer: </s>
            <s xml:space="preserve">Firſt, Heavineſs can only be
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            applied unto thoſe Bodies which are out of
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            their proper places, or unto ſuch parts as
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            are ſevered from the whole to which they
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            belong. </s>
            <s xml:space="preserve">And therefore the Globe of Earth,
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            conſidered as whole, and in its right place,
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            cannot truly be called heavy. </s>
            <s xml:space="preserve">I deny not,
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            but that there is in it, and ſo likewiſe in
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            the other Planets, an ineptitude to motion,
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            by reaſon of the matter and condenſity of
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            their Bodies: </s>
            <s xml:space="preserve">And ſo likewiſe there is, as
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            truly, (though not according to the ſame
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            degrees) in the leaſt particle of a material
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            condenſed Subſtance: </s>
            <s xml:space="preserve">ſo that this cannot
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            reaſonably be pretended as a juſt Impedi-
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            ment, why the Earth ſhould be incapable of
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            ſuch a Motion. </s>
            <s xml:space="preserve">Secondly, And though this
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            Globe be of ſo vaſt a magnitude, yet, as
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            Nature beſtows upon other Creatures (for
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            inſtance, an Eagle and a Fly) Spirits, and
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            motive Powers, proportionable to their ſe-
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            veral Bodies: </s>
            <s xml:space="preserve">ſo likewiſe may ſhe endow</s>
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