Wilkins, John, A discovery of a new world : or a discourse tending to prove, that 'tis probable there may be another Habitable World in the Moon ; with a discourse concerning the Probability of a Passage thither; unto which is added, a discourse concerning a New Planet, tending to prove, that 'tis probable our earth is one of the Planets

Page concordance

< >
Scan Original
71 59
72 60
73 61
74 42
75 63
76 65
77 65
78 66
79 67
80 68
81 69
82 70
83 71
84 72
85 73
86 74
87 75
88 76
89 77
90 78
91 79
92 80
93 81
94 82
95 83
96 84
97 85
98 86
99 87
100 88
< >
page |< < (53) of 370 > >|
That the Moon may be a World.
in hac terra, & c. As if he had conceived the
Moon to be a great hollow Body, in the midſt
oſ whoſe Concavity, there ſhould be another
Globe oſ Sea and Land, inhabited by Men, as
as our Earth is.
Whereas it ſeems to be
more likely by the Relation of others, that
this Philoſophers Opinion is to be underſtood
in the ſame Senſe, as it is here to be prov’d.
True indeed, the Father condemns this Aſſer-
tion as an equal Abſurdity to that of Anaxaga-
ras, who affirm’d the Snow to be black:
but
no wonder, for in the very next Chapter, it is
that he does ſo much deride the Opinion of
thoſe who thought there were Antipodes.
So
that his ignorance in that particular, may per-
haps diſable him from being a Competent
Judge in any other like point in Philoſophy.

Upon theſe agreed Pythagoras, who thought
that our Earth was but one of the Planets
which mov’d round about the Sun, (as Ari-
De Cælo.
l. 2. cap. 13.
ſtotle relates of him) and the Pythagoreans in
general did affirm, that the Moon was alſo Ter-
reſtrial, and that ſhe was Inhabited as this low-
er World;
That thoſe living Creatures and
Plants which are in her, exceed any of the
like kind, with us in the ſame proportion, as
Plut. ibid.
cap. 30.
their Days are longer than ours, viz.
by 15.
times. This Pythagoras was eſteem’d by all of a
moſt Divine Wit, as appears eſpecially by his
valuation amongſt the Romans, who being com-
manded by the Oracle to erecta Statue to the
wiſeſt Græcian, the Senate determin’d Pythago-
ras to be meant, preferring him in their Judge-
Plin. Nat.
Hiſt. l. 34,
cip. 6.
ment before the Divine Socrates, whom their
Gods pronounc’d the Wiſeſt.
Some think

Text layer

  • Dictionary

Text normalization

  • Original

Search


  • Exact
  • All forms
  • Fulltext index
  • Morphological index