Wilkins, John, A discovery of a new world : or a discourse tending to prove, that 'tis probable there may be another Habitable World in the Moon ; with a discourse concerning the Probability of a Passage thither; unto which is added, a discourse concerning a New Planet, tending to prove, that 'tis probable our earth is one of the Planets

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That the Moon may be a World.
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          <p>
            <s xml:space="preserve">
              <pb o="88" file="0100" n="100" rhead="That the Moon may be a World."/>
            of the Hegheſt. </s>
            <s xml:space="preserve">Nay, Solinus (whom I ſhould
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              <anchor type="note" xlink:label="note-0100-01a" xlink:href="note-0100-01"/>
            rather believe in this kind) affirms, that this
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            Mountain gives his ſhadow quite over the Sea,
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            from Macedon to the Iſle of Lemnos, which is
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            700 Furlongs, or 84 Miles, and yet according
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            to the common Reckoning, it doth ſcarce reach
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            4 Miles up wards, in its Perpendicular height.</s>
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          </p>
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            <note position="right" xlink:label="note-0099-01" xlink:href="note-0099-01a" xml:space="preserve">Hiſt. l. 1.c.
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            7. Sect. 11.</note>
            <note position="left" xlink:label="note-0100-01" xlink:href="note-0100-01a" xml:space="preserve">Pely. biſtor.
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            6. 21.</note>
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          <p>
            <s xml:space="preserve">2. </s>
            <s xml:space="preserve">I affirm, that there are very high Moun-
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            tains in the Moon. </s>
            <s xml:space="preserve">Keplar and Galilæus think,
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            that they are higher than any which are upon
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            our Earth. </s>
            <s xml:space="preserve">But I am not of their Opinion in this,
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            becauſe I ſuppoſe they go upon a falſe Ground,
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            whilſt they Conceive, that the higheſt Moun-
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            tain upon the Earth is not above a Mile Per-
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            pendicular.</s>
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          </p>
          <p>
            <s xml:space="preserve">Whereas ’tis the common Opinion, and found
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            true enough by Obſervation, that Olympus,
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            Atlas, Taurus and Emus, with many others, are
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            much above this height. </s>
            <s xml:space="preserve">Tenariffa in the
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            Canary Iſlands, is commonly related to be
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            above 8 Miles Perpendicular, and about this
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            height (ſay ſome) is the Mount Perjacaca in
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            America. </s>
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            Sir Walter Rawleigh ſeems to think,
              <anchor type="note" xlink:label="note-0100-02a" xlink:href="note-0100-02"/>
            that the higheſt of theſe is near 30 Miles up-
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            right. </s>
            <s xml:space="preserve">nay, Ariſtotle ſpeaking of Gaucaſus in
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            Aſia, affirins it to be Viſible for 560 Miles, as
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            ſome Interpreters find by Computation; </s>
            <s xml:space="preserve">from
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            which it will follow, that it was 78 Miles Per-
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            pendicularly high, as you may ſee confirm'd by
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            Facobus Mazonius, and out of him in Blancanus
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              <anchor type="note" xlink:label="note-0100-03a" xlink:href="note-0100-03"/>
            the Jeſuit. </s>
            <s xml:space="preserve">But this Deviates from the truth,
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            more in Exceſs, than the other doth in defect.
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            </s>
            <s xml:space="preserve">However, though theſe in the Moon are
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            not ſo high asſome amongſt us; </s>
            <s xml:space="preserve">yet certain
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            it is they are of a great height, and ſome of</s>
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