Wilkins, John, A discovery of a new world : or a discourse tending to prove, that 'tis probable there may be another Habitable World in the Moon ; with a discourse concerning the Probability of a Passage thither; unto which is added, a discourse concerning a New Planet, tending to prove, that 'tis probable our earth is one of the Planets

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That the Moon may be a World.
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              <pb o="67" file="0079" n="79" rhead="That the Moon may be a World."/>
            thicker parts appearing in her, do ſhew the
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            difference betwixt the Sea and Land in that
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            other World? </s>
            <s xml:space="preserve">and Galilæus doubts not, but
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            that if our Earth were viſible at the ſame di-
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            ſtance, there would be the like appearance of it.</s>
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          </p>
          <p>
            <s xml:space="preserve">If we conſider the Moon as another habi-
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            table Earth, then the appearances of it will
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            be altogether exact, and beautiful, and may
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            argue unto that, it is fully accompliſhed for
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            all thoſe ends to which Providence did appoint
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            it. </s>
            <s xml:space="preserve">But conſider it barely as a Star or Light,
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            and then there will appear in it much imper-
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            fection and deformity, as being of an impure
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            dark ſubſtance, and ſo unfit for the Office of
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            that Nature.</s>
            <s xml:space="preserve"/>
          </p>
          <p>
            <s xml:space="preserve">As for the Form of thoſe Spots, ſome of
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            the Vulgar think, they repreſent a Man, and
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            the Poetsgueſs, ’tis the Boy Endymion, whoſe
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            Company ſhe Loves ſo well, that ſhe carries
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            him with her; </s>
            <s xml:space="preserve">others will have it only to be
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            the Face of a Man, as the Moon is uſually pi-
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            ctured; </s>
            <s xml:space="preserve">but Albertus thinks rather, that it re-
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              <anchor type="note" xlink:label="note-0079-01a" xlink:href="note-0079-01"/>
            preſents a Lyon, with his Tail towards the
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            Eaſt, and his Head the Weſt, and ſome others
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              <anchor type="note" xlink:href="" symbol="*"/>
            have thought it to be very much like a Fox,and certainly, ’tis as much like a Lyon, as that
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            in the Zodiake, or as Urſa major is like a Bear.</s>
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          <div type="float" level="2" n="8">
            <note symbol="*" position="right" xlink:label="note-0079-01" xlink:href="note-0079-01a" xml:space="preserve">Euſebius
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            Nicremb.
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            Hiſt. Na.
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            l. 8. c. 19.</note>
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          <p>
            <s xml:space="preserve">I ſhould gueſs, that it repreſents one of
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            theſe, as well as another, and any thing elſe,
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            as well as any of theſe, ſince ’tis but a ſtrong ima-
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            gination, which fancies ſuch Images, as School
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            Boys uſually do, in the marks of a Wall, where-
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            as there is not any ſuch ſimilitude in the ſpots
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            themſelves, which rather like our Sea, in re-
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            ſpect of the Land, appears under a rugged and</s>
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