Wilkins, John, A discovery of a new world : or a discourse tending to prove, that 'tis probable there may be another Habitable World in the Moon ; with a discourse concerning the Probability of a Passage thither; unto which is added, a discourse concerning a New Planet, tending to prove, that 'tis probable our earth is one of the Planets

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That the Earth may be a Planet.
derſtood only in relation to outward ap-
pearances, and vulgar opinion.

PROP. IV.

That divers learned Men have fallen into
# great Abſurdities, whilſt they have
# looked for the Grounds of Philoſophy
# from the words of Scripture.
IT has been an ancient and common opi-
nion amongſt the Jews, that the Law of
Moſes did contain in it, not only thoſe things
which concern our Religion and Obedience,
but every Secret alſo that may poſſibly be
known in any Art or Science;
ſo that there
Schickard,
Bechin.
Hapern.
Diſp. 5.
num. 8.
is not a Demonſtration in Geometry, or
Rule in Arithmetick;
not a Myſtery in any
Trade, but it may be found out in the
Pentatcuch.
Hence it was (ſay they) that
Solomon had all his Wiſdom and Policy:
Hence it was that he did fetch his Knowledg
concerning the nature of Vegetables, from
the Cedar of Lebanon to the Hyſop that
grows upon the Wall.
Nay, from hence,
they thought a Man might learn the Art of
Miracles, to removea Mountain, or recover
the dead.
So ſtrangely have the learneder
ſort of that Nation been befooled, ſince their
own Curſe hath lighted upon them.

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