Wilkins, John, A discovery of a new world : or a discourse tending to prove, that 'tis probable there may be another Habitable World in the Moon ; with a discourse concerning the Probability of a Passage thither; unto which is added, a discourse concerning a New Planet, tending to prove, that 'tis probable our earth is one of the Planets

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That the Moon may be a World.
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          <pb o="74" file="0086" n="86" rhead="That the Moon may be a World."/>
          <p>
            <s xml:space="preserve">Before I proceed to the next Poſition, I ſhall
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            firſt anſwer ſome Doubts which might be
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            made againſt the generality of this Truth,
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            whereby it may ſeem impoſſible that there
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            ſhould be either Sea or Land in the Moon;
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            </s>
            <s xml:space="preserve">for ſince ſhe moves ſo ſwiftly as Aſtronomers
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            obſerve, why then does their nothing fall from
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            her, or why doth ſhe not ſhake ſomething out
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            by the celerity of her Revolution; </s>
            <s xml:space="preserve">I anſwer,
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            you muſt know that the Inclination of every
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            heavy Body to its proper Centre, doth ſuffici-
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            ently tye it unto its place; </s>
            <s xml:space="preserve">ſo that ſuppoſe any
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            thing were ſeparated, yet muſt it neceſlarily
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            return again. </s>
            <s xml:space="preserve">And there is no more danger of
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            their Falling into our World, than there is
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            Fear our falling into the Moon.</s>
            <s xml:space="preserve"/>
          </p>
          <p>
            <s xml:space="preserve">But there are many Fabulous Relations of
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            ſuch things as have dropped thence. </s>
            <s xml:space="preserve">There is
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            a Tale of the Nemean Lyon that Hercules ſlew,
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              <anchor type="note" xlink:label="note-0086-01a" xlink:href="note-0086-01"/>
            which firſt ruſhing among the Herds out of
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            his unknown Den in the Mountain of Gytheron
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            in Bæotia, the credulous People thought he was
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            ſent from the Goddeſs the Moon. </s>
            <s xml:space="preserve">And if a
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            Whirlwind did chance to ſnatch any thing up,
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            and afterwards Rain it down again, the igno-
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            rant multitude were apt to believe that it
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            dropt from Heaven. </s>
            <s xml:space="preserve">Thus Avicenna relates
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            a Story of a Calf which fell down in a Storm,
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            the Beholders thinking it a Moon-Calf, and
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            that it fell thence. </s>
            <s xml:space="preserve">So Gardan Travelling up-
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            on the Apennine Mountains, a ſudden Blaſt
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            took off his Hat, which if it had been car-
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            ryed far, he thinks the Peaſants, who had per-
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            ceiv'd it to fall, would have ſworn it had
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            Rained Hats. </s>
            <s xml:space="preserve">After ſome ſuch manner, ma-</s>
          </p>
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