Wilkins, John, A discovery of a new world : or a discourse tending to prove, that 'tis probable there may be another Habitable World in the Moon ; with a discourse concerning the Probability of a Passage thither; unto which is added, a discourse concerning a New Planet, tending to prove, that 'tis probable our earth is one of the Planets

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That the Moon may be a World.
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              <pb o="117" file="0129" n="129" rhead="That the Moon may be a World."/>
            as HI. </s>
            <s xml:space="preserve">Suppoſe EF likewiſe to repreſent half
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            the Heavens, wherein was this appearing Co-
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            met at K. </s>
            <s xml:space="preserve">Now I ſay, that a contracted Va-
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            pour, as G, could not cauſe this appearance,
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            becauſe an Inhabitant at M could not diſcern
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            the ſame Star with the brightneſs, but perhaps
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            another at L, betwixt which the Vapour is di-
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            rectly interpoſed. </s>
            <s xml:space="preserve">Nor could it be cauſed by a
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            dilated Vapour, as HI, becauſe then all the
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            Stars that were diſcern’d through it, would be
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            perceiv’d with the ſame brightneſs.</s>
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            <s xml:space="preserve">’Tis neceſſary therefore that the cauſe of this
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            appearance ſhould be in the Heavens. </s>
            <s xml:space="preserve">And this
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            is granted by the moſt and beſt Aſtronomers.
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            </s>
            <s xml:space="preserve">But, ſay ſome, this doth not argue any natural
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            Alteration in thoſe purer Bodies, ſince ’tis pro-
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            bable that the Concourſe of many little Va-
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            gabond Stars, by the Union of their Beams
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            may cauſe ſo great a Light. </s>
            <s xml:space="preserve">Of this Opinion
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            were Anaxagor as and Zeno amongſt the Anci-
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            ents, and Baptiſta Giſatus, Blancanus, with
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            others amongſt our modern Aſtronomers. </s>
            <s xml:space="preserve">For,
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            ſay they, when there happens to be a Con-
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            courſe of ſome few Stars, then do many others
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            fly unto them from all the parts of Heaven like
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            ſo many Bees unto their King. </s>
            <s xml:space="preserve">But 1. </s>
            <s xml:space="preserve">’Tis not
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            likely that amongſt thoſe which we count the
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            fixed Stars, there ſhould be any ſuch uncertain
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            Motions, that they can wander from all parts
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            of the Heavens, as if Nature had neglected
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            them, or forgot to appoint them a determi-
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            nate Courſe. </s>
            <s xml:space="preserve">2. </s>
            <s xml:space="preserve">If there be ſuch a Conſlux
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            of theſe, as of Bees to their King, then what
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            reaſon is there, that they do not ſtill tarry with
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            it, that ſo the Comet may not be diſſolv’d ?</s>
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