Wilkins, John, A discovery of a new world : or a discourse tending to prove, that 'tis probable there may be another Habitable World in the Moon ; with a discourse concerning the Probability of a Passage thither; unto which is added, a discourse concerning a New Planet, tending to prove, that 'tis probable our earth is one of the Planets

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That the Earth may be a Planet.
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              <pb o="109" file="0289" n="289" rhead="That the Earth may be a Planet."/>
            thing, becauſe it was ſo in one thing: </s>
            <s xml:space="preserve">And
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            this would be an excellent Argument to prove
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            that Opinion of Anaxagoras, that the Snow
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            was black.</s>
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            <s xml:space="preserve">The reaſon why that motion which is
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            cauſed by the Earth, does appear as if it
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            were in the Heavens, is, becauſe the ſenſus
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            communis, in judging of it, does conceive
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            the Eye to be it ſelf immovable, (as was
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            ſaid before) there being no ſenſe that does
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            diſcern the effects of any motion in the Bo-
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            dy; </s>
            <s xml:space="preserve">and therefore, it does conclude every
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            thing to move, which it does perceive to
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            change its diſtance from it: </s>
            <s xml:space="preserve">So that the
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            Clouds do not ſeem to move ſometimes,
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            when as notwithſtanding they are every
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            where carried about with our Earth, by ſuch
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            a ſwift revolution; </s>
            <s xml:space="preserve">yet this can be no hin-
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            drance at all, why we may not judg aright
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            of their other particular Motions, for which
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            there is not the ſame reaſon. </s>
            <s xml:space="preserve">Though to a
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            Man in a Ship, the Trees and Banks may
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            ſeem to move; </s>
            <s xml:space="preserve">yet it would be but a weak
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            Argument, to conclude from thence, that
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            therefore ſuch a one could not tell whether
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            his Friend does really ſtir, whom he ſees to
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            walk up and down in the Ship: </s>
            <s xml:space="preserve">or that he
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            might as well be deceived in judging the
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            Oars to move, when they do not.</s>
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            <s xml:space="preserve">’Tis again replied by the ſame Objector,
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            That it is not credible, the Eye ſhould be
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            miſtaken in judging of the Stars and Hea-
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            vens; </s>
            <s xml:space="preserve">becauſe thoſe being light Bodies, are
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            the primary & </s>
            <s xml:space="preserve">proper Objects of that Senſe.</s>
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