Wilkins, John, A discovery of a new world : or a discourse tending to prove, that 'tis probable there may be another Habitable World in the Moon ; with a discourse concerning the Probability of a Passage thither; unto which is added, a discourse concerning a New Planet, tending to prove, that 'tis probable our earth is one of the Planets

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That the Earth may be a Planet.
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            <s xml:space="preserve">The Arguments from Aſtronomy, are
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            chieſly theſe four; </s>
            <s xml:space="preserve">each of which are boaſt-
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            ed of to be unanſwerable.</s>
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            <s xml:space="preserve">Arg. </s>
            <s xml:space="preserve">1. </s>
            <s xml:space="preserve">The Horizon does every where
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            divide all the great Circles of a Sphere in-
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            to two equal parts : </s>
            <s xml:space="preserve">So there is always half
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            the Equinoctial above it, and half below.
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            </s>
            <s xml:space="preserve">Thus likewiſe, there will conſtantly be ſix
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            Signs oſ the Zodiack above the Horizon, and
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            other ſix below it. </s>
            <s xml:space="preserve">And beſides, the Circles
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            of the Heaven and Earth, are each way
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            proportionable to one another; </s>
            <s xml:space="preserve">as fifteen
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            German miles on the Earth, are every where
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            agreeable to one Degree in the Heavens; </s>
            <s xml:space="preserve">and
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            one Hour in the Earth, is correſpondent to
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            fifteen Degrees in the Equator. </s>
            <s xml:space="preserve">From whence
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            it may be inferred, that the Earth muſt ne-
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            ceſſarily be ſcituated in the midſt of theſe
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            Circles; </s>
            <s xml:space="preserve">and ſo conſequently, in the Centre
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            of the World.</s>
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            <s xml:space="preserve">I anſwer : </s>
            <s xml:space="preserve">This Argument does rightly
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            prove the Earth to be in the midſt of theſe
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            Circles : </s>
            <s xml:space="preserve">But we cannot hence conclude, that
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            it is in the Centre of the World: </s>
            <s xml:space="preserve">from which,
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            tho it were never ſo much diſtant, yet would
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            it ſtill remain in the midſt of thoſe Circles,
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            becauſe it is the Eye that imagines them to
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            be deſcribed about it. </s>
            <s xml:space="preserve">Wherefore it were a
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            weak and prepoſterous Collection, to argue
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            thus, That the Earth is in the Centre of the
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            World, becauſe in the midſt of thoſe Cir-
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            cles; </s>
            <s xml:space="preserve">or becauſe the Parts and Degrees of
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            the Earth, are anſwerable in proportion to
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            the Parts and Degrees in Heaven. </s>
            <s xml:space="preserve">Whereas,</s>
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