Wilkins, John, A discovery of a new world : or a discourse tending to prove, that 'tis probable there may be another Habitable World in the Moon ; with a discourse concerning the Probability of a Passage thither; unto which is added, a discourse concerning a New Planet, tending to prove, that 'tis probable our earth is one of the Planets

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That the Eartb may be a Planet.
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              <pb o="95" file="0275" n="275" rhead="That the Eartb may be a Planet."/>
            tude is fifty Thirds, which is comprehended
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            in that of the Sun 2160 times. </s>
            <s xml:space="preserve">Now if the
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            Sun were removed ſo far from us, that its
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            Diameter would ſeem but as one of that
              <lb/>
            number whereof it now contains 2160, then
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            muſt his diſtance from us be 2160 times
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            greater than now it is: </s>
            <s xml:space="preserve">which is all one, as
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            if we ſhould ſay, that a Star of the ſixth
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            Magnitude is ſevered from us by ſo many Se-
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            midiameters of the Earth's Orb. </s>
            <s xml:space="preserve">But now,
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            according to common conſent, the diſtance
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            of the Earth from the Sun, does contain 128
              <lb/>
            Semidiameters of the Earth; </s>
            <s xml:space="preserve">and (as was
              <lb/>
            faid before) this ſuppoſed diſtance of the
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            fixed Stars, does comprehend 2160 Semi-
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            diameters of the Earth's Orb. </s>
            <s xml:space="preserve">From whence
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            it is manifeſt, that the Semidiametey of the
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            Earth, in compariſon to its diſtance from the
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            Sun, will be almoſt doubly bigger than the
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            Semidiameter of the Earth's Orb, in com-
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            pariſon to this diſtance of the Stars. </s>
            <s xml:space="preserve">But
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            now the Semidiameter of the Earth, does
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            make very little difference in the appear-
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            ance of the Sun, becauſe we ſee common
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            Obſervations upon the Surface of it, are as
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            exactly true to the ſenſe, as if they were
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            made from the Centre of it. </s>
            <s xml:space="preserve">Wherefore,
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            that difference which would be made in
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            theſe fixed Stars, by the annual courſe of
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            the Earth, muſt needs be much more unob-
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            fervable, or rather altogether inſenſible.</s>
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            <note position="left" xlink:label="note-0274-03" xlink:href="note-0274-03a" xml:space="preserve">Vid Galil.
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            ibid.</note>
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            <s xml:space="preserve">2. </s>
            <s xml:space="preserve">The Conſequence of this Argument, is
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            grounded upon this falfe ſuppoſition, That
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            every Body muſt neceſſarily be of an equal</s>
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