Wilkins, John, A discovery of a new world : or a discourse tending to prove, that 'tis probable there may be another Habitable World in the Moon ; with a discourse concerning the Probability of a Passage thither; unto which is added, a discourse concerning a New Planet, tending to prove, that 'tis probable our earth is one of the Planets

Table of figures

< >
< >
page |< < (115) of 370 > >|
That the Earth may be a Planet.
    <echo version="1.0RC">
      <text xml:lang="en" type="free">
        <div type="section" level="1" n="63">
          <p>
            <s xml:space="preserve">
              <pb o="115" file="0295" n="295" rhead="That the Earth may be a Planet."/>
            a Loadſtone, in reſpect of its matter and
              <lb/>
            condenſity, naturally tends downward; </s>
            <s xml:space="preserve">yet
              <lb/>
            this does not hinder, but that in reſpect of
              <lb/>
            ſome other qualities, as its deſire of union
              <lb/>
            and coition to another Loadſtone, it may
              <lb/>
            alſo naturally move upwards. </s>
            <s xml:space="preserve">From
              <lb/>
            whence it will follow, that the ſame Ele-
              <lb/>
            mentary Body, may have divers natural
              <lb/>
            Motions.</s>
            <s xml:space="preserve"/>
          </p>
          <p>
            <s xml:space="preserve">5. </s>
            <s xml:space="preserve">The gravity and magnitude of this
              <lb/>
            Earthy Globe, do make it altogether unfit
              <lb/>
            for ſo ſwift a Motion.</s>
            <s xml:space="preserve"/>
          </p>
          <p>
            <s xml:space="preserve">I anſwer: </s>
            <s xml:space="preserve">Firſt, Heavineſs can only be
              <lb/>
            applied unto thoſe Bodies which are out of
              <lb/>
            their proper places, or unto ſuch parts as
              <lb/>
            are ſevered from the whole to which they
              <lb/>
            belong. </s>
            <s xml:space="preserve">And therefore the Globe of Earth,
              <lb/>
            conſidered as whole, and in its right place,
              <lb/>
            cannot truly be called heavy. </s>
            <s xml:space="preserve">I deny not,
              <lb/>
            but that there is in it, and ſo likewiſe in
              <lb/>
            the other Planets, an ineptitude to motion,
              <lb/>
            by reaſon of the matter and condenſity of
              <lb/>
            their Bodies: </s>
            <s xml:space="preserve">And ſo likewiſe there is, as
              <lb/>
            truly, (though not according to the ſame
              <lb/>
            degrees) in the leaſt particle of a material
              <lb/>
            condenſed Subſtance: </s>
            <s xml:space="preserve">ſo that this cannot
              <lb/>
            reaſonably be pretended as a juſt Impedi-
              <lb/>
            ment, why the Earth ſhould be incapable of
              <lb/>
            ſuch a Motion. </s>
            <s xml:space="preserve">Secondly, And though this
              <lb/>
            Globe be of ſo vaſt a magnitude, yet, as
              <lb/>
            Nature beſtows upon other Creatures (for
              <lb/>
            inſtance, an Eagle and a Fly) Spirits, and
              <lb/>
            motive Powers, proportionable to their ſe-
              <lb/>
            veral Bodies: </s>
            <s xml:space="preserve">ſo likewiſe may ſhe endow</s>
          </p>
        </div>
      </text>
    </echo>