Wilkins, John, A discovery of a new world : or a discourse tending to prove, that 'tis probable there may be another Habitable World in the Moon ; with a discourse concerning the Probability of a Passage thither; unto which is added, a discourse concerning a New Planet, tending to prove, that 'tis probable our earth is one of the Planets

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That the Earth may be a Planet.
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              <pb o="121" file="0301" n="301" rhead="That the Earth may be a Planet."/>
            Though we could not ſhew any ſimilitude of
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            this Motion in theſe inferior Bodies, with
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            which we are acquainted; </s>
            <s xml:space="preserve">yet we muſt
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            know, there may be many things which a-
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            gree to the whole Frame, that are not diſ-
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            cernable in divers parts of it. </s>
            <s xml:space="preserve">’Tis natural
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            unto the Sea to ebb and flow, but yet there
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            is not this Motion in every drop or bucket
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            of Water. </s>
            <s xml:space="preserve">So if we conſider every part of
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            our Bodies ſeverally, the Humors, Bones,
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            Fleſh, &</s>
            <s xml:space="preserve">c. </s>
            <s xml:space="preserve">they are all of them apt to tend
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            downwards, as being of a condenſed Mat-
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            ter; </s>
            <s xml:space="preserve">but yet conſider them according to the
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            whole Frame, and then the Blood or Hu-
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            mors may naturally aſcend upvvards to the
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            Head, as vvell as deſcend to any of the
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            lovver parts. </s>
            <s xml:space="preserve">Thus the vvhole Earth may
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            move round, though the ſeveral parts of it
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            have not any ſuch particular Revolution of
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            their ovvn. </s>
            <s xml:space="preserve">Thus likevviſe, though each
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            condenſed Body being conſidered by it ſelf,
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            may ſeem to have only a Motion of deſcent,
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            yet in reference to that vvhole Frame, of
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            vvhich it is a part, it may alſo partake
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            of another Motion that may be natural un-
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            to it.</s>
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            <s xml:space="preserve">But ſome may here object: </s>
            <s xml:space="preserve">Though the
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            Earth vvere endovved vvith ſuch Magnetical
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            Affections, yet vvhat probability is there
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            that it ſhould have ſuch a Revolution? </s>
            <s xml:space="preserve">I an-
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            ſvver: </s>
            <s xml:space="preserve">’Tis obſerved of thoſe other Mag-
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            netical Bodies of Saturn, Jupiter, and the
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            Sun, that they are carried about their ovvn
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            Centers; </s>
            <s xml:space="preserve">and therefore ’tis not improbable,</s>
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