Wilkins, John, A discovery of a new world : or a discourse tending to prove, that 'tis probable there may be another Habitable World in the Moon ; with a discourse concerning the Probability of a Passage thither; unto which is added, a discourse concerning a New Planet, tending to prove, that 'tis probable our earth is one of the Planets

Table of figures

< >
< >
page |< < (134) of 370 > >|
That the Earth may be a Planet.
    <echo version="1.0RC">
      <text xml:lang="en" type="free">
        <div type="section" level="1" n="63">
          <pb o="134" file="0314" n="314" rhead="That the Earth may be a Planet."/>
          <p>
            <s xml:space="preserve">Arg. </s>
            <s xml:space="preserve">2. </s>
            <s xml:space="preserve">The Air which is next the Earth,
              <lb/>
            would be purer, as being rarified with Mo-
              <lb/>
            tion.</s>
            <s xml:space="preserve"/>
          </p>
          <p>
            <s xml:space="preserve">Arg. </s>
            <s xml:space="preserve">3. </s>
            <s xml:space="preserve">If the Earth did move the Air, it
              <lb/>
            would cauſe ſome ſound; </s>
            <s xml:space="preserve">but this is no more
              <lb/>
            audible, than Pythagoras his Harmony of the
              <lb/>
            Heavens.</s>
            <s xml:space="preserve"/>
          </p>
          <p>
            <s xml:space="preserve">Arg. </s>
            <s xml:space="preserve">4. </s>
            <s xml:space="preserve">’Twould have been in vain for
              <lb/>
            Nature to have endowed the Heavens with
              <lb/>
            all conditions requiſite for motion, if they
              <lb/>
            had been to ſtand ſtill: </s>
            <s xml:space="preserve">As, firſt, they have
              <lb/>
            a round Figure. </s>
            <s xml:space="preserve">Secondly, They have nei-
              <lb/>
            ther gravity nor levity. </s>
            <s xml:space="preserve">Thirdly, They
              <lb/>
            are incorruptible. </s>
            <s xml:space="preserve">Fourthly, They have
              <lb/>
            no contrary.</s>
            <s xml:space="preserve"/>
          </p>
          <p>
            <s xml:space="preserve">Arg. </s>
            <s xml:space="preserve">5. </s>
            <s xml:space="preserve">All ſimilary parts are of the ſame
              <lb/>
            nature with the whole: </s>
            <s xml:space="preserve">But each part of
              <lb/>
            the Earth does reſt in its place; </s>
            <s xml:space="preserve">therefore
              <lb/>
            alfo doth the whole.</s>
            <s xml:space="preserve"/>
          </p>
          <p>
            <s xml:space="preserve">Arg. </s>
            <s xml:space="preserve">6. </s>
            <s xml:space="preserve">The Sun in the World, is as the
              <lb/>
            Heart in a Man's Body: </s>
            <s xml:space="preserve">But the Motion of
              <lb/>
            the Heart ceaſing, none of the Members do
              <lb/>
            ſtir; </s>
            <s xml:space="preserve">therefore alſo if the Sun ſhould ſtand
              <lb/>
            ſtill, the other parts of the World would be
              <lb/>
            without motion.</s>
            <s xml:space="preserve"/>
          </p>
          <p>
            <s xml:space="preserve">Arg. </s>
            <s xml:space="preserve">7. </s>
            <s xml:space="preserve">The Sun and Heavens, do work
              <lb/>
            upon theſe inferior Bodies by their Light
              <lb/>
            and Motion. </s>
            <s xml:space="preserve">So the Moon does operate up-
              <lb/>
            on the Sea.</s>
            <s xml:space="preserve"/>
          </p>
          <p>
            <s xml:space="preserve">Arg. </s>
            <s xml:space="preserve">8. </s>
            <s xml:space="preserve">The Earth is the Foundation of
              <lb/>
            Buildings; </s>
            <s xml:space="preserve">and therefore muſt be firm and
              <lb/>
            ſtable.</s>
            <s xml:space="preserve"/>
          </p>
          <p>
            <s xml:space="preserve">Arg. </s>
            <s xml:space="preserve">9. </s>
            <s xml:space="preserve">’Tis the conſtant opinion of Di-
              <lb/>
            vines, that the Heavens ſhall reſt after the</s>
          </p>
        </div>
      </text>
    </echo>