Wilkins, John, A discovery of a new world : or a discourse tending to prove, that 'tis probable there may be another Habitable World in the Moon ; with a discourse concerning the Probability of a Passage thither; unto which is added, a discourse concerning a New Planet, tending to prove, that 'tis probable our earth is one of the Planets

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That the Earth may be a Planet.
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              <pb o="119" file="0299" n="299" rhead="That the Earth may be a Planet."/>
            the lower parts of this Globe, do not con-
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            ſiſt of ſuch a ſoft fructifying Earth, as there
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            is in the Surface, (becauſe there can be no
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            ſuch uſe for it as here, and Nature does no-
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            thing in vain) but rather of ſome hard
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            rocky ſubſtance, ſince we may well conceive,
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            that theſe lower parts are preſſed cloſe to-
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            gether, by the weight of all thoſe heavy
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            Bodies above them. </s>
            <s xml:space="preserve">Now, ’tis probable,
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            that this rocky Subſtance is a Loadſtone, ra-
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            ther than a Jaſpis, Adamant, Marble, or
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            any other; </s>
            <s xml:space="preserve">becauſe experience teacheth us,
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            that the Earth and Loadſtone do agree to-
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            gether in ſo many Properties. </s>
            <s xml:space="preserve">Suppoſe a
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            Man were to judg the Matter of divers Bo-
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            dies; </s>
            <s xml:space="preserve">each of which ſhould be wrap'd up
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            in ſome covering from his Eye, ſo that he
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            might only examine them by ſome other
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            outward ſigns: </s>
            <s xml:space="preserve">If in this examination, he
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            ſhould find any particular Body which had
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            all the Properties that are peculiar to a
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            Loadſtone, he would in reaſon conclude it
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            to be of that Nature, rather than any other.
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            </s>
            <s xml:space="preserve">Now there is altogether as much reaſon why
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            we ſhould infer, that the inward parts of
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            the Earth do conſiſt of a Magnetical Sub-
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            ſtance. </s>
            <s xml:space="preserve">The agreement of theſe two, you
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            may ſee largely ſet forth in the Treatiſe of
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            Dr. </s>
            <s xml:space="preserve">Gilbert. </s>
            <s xml:space="preserve">I will inſtance only in one Ex-
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            ample, which of it ſelf may ſufficiently evi-
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            dence, that the Globe of Earth does par-
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            take of the like affections with the Load-
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            ſtone. </s>
            <s xml:space="preserve">In the Mariner's Needle, you may
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            obſerve the Magnetical Motions of Directi-</s>
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