Wilkins, John, A discovery of a new world : or a discourse tending to prove, that 'tis probable there may be another Habitable World in the Moon ; with a discourse concerning the Probability of a Passage thither; unto which is added, a discourse concerning a New Planet, tending to prove, that 'tis probable our earth is one of the Planets

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That the Moon may be a World.
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              <pb o="160" file="0172" n="172" rhead="That the Moon may be a World."/>
            later Chapter did unwittingly agree with it) there is de-
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            liver’d a pleaſant and well contriv’d Fancy concerning a
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            Voyage to this other World.</s>
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          <p>
            <s xml:space="preserve">He ſuppoſeth that there is a natural and uſual paſſage
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            for many creatures betwixt our Earth and this Planet. </s>
            <s xml:space="preserve">Thus
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            he ſays; </s>
            <s xml:space="preserve">thoſe great multitudes of Locuſts wherewith
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            divers Countries have been deſtroyed, do proceed from
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            thence. </s>
            <s xml:space="preserve">And if we peruſe the Authors who treat of them,
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            we ſhall find that many times they fly in numberleſs
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            Troops, or Swarms, and for ſundry days together before
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            they fall, are ſeen over thoſe places in great high Clouds,
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            fuch as coming nearer, are of extenſion enough to obſcure
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            the day, and hinder the light of the Sun. </s>
            <s xml:space="preserve">From which,
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            together with divers other ſuch Relations, he concludes, that
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            ’tis not altogether improbable, they ſhould proceed from
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            the Moon. </s>
            <s xml:space="preserve">Thus likewiſe he ſuppoſes the Swallows,
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            Cuckoes, Nightingales, with divers other Fowl, which are
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            with us only half a year, to fly up thither, when they go
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            from us. </s>
            <s xml:space="preserve">Amongſt which kind, there is a wild Swan in
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            the Eaſt Indies, which at certain Seaſons of the year do
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            conſtantly take their flight thither. </s>
            <s xml:space="preserve">Now this Bird being
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            of a great Strength, able to continue for a long Flight;
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            </s>
            <s xml:space="preserve">as alſo going uſually in Flocks, like our Wild Geeſe; </s>
            <s xml:space="preserve">he
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            ſuppoſeth that many of them together, might be thought
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            to carry the weight of a Man; </s>
            <s xml:space="preserve">eſpecially, if an Engine
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            were ſo contriv’d (as he thinks it might) that each of them
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            ſhould bear an equal ſhare in the burden. </s>
            <s xml:space="preserve">So that by this
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            means, ’tis eaſily conceivable, how once a year a man might
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            finiſh ſuch Voyage; </s>
            <s xml:space="preserve">going along with theſe Birds at the
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            beginning of Winter, and again returning with them at
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            the Spring.</s>
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            <s xml:space="preserve">And here, one that had a ſtrong Fancy, were better able
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            to ſet forth the great benefit and Pleaſure to be had by ſuch
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            a Journey. </s>
            <s xml:space="preserve">And that whether you conſider the ſtrangeneſs
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            of the Perſons, Language, Art, Policy, Religion of thoſe
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            Inhabitants, together with the new Traffick that might be
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            brought thence, In brief, do but conſider the pleaſure
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            and profit of thoſe later Diſcoveries in America, and we
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            muſt needs conclude this to be inconceiveably beyond it.</s>
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            <s xml:space="preserve">But ſuch Imaginations as theſc, I ſhall leave to the Fancy
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            of the Reader.</s>
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          <p style="it">
            <s xml:space="preserve">----------- Sic itur ad aſtra.
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            </s>
            <s xml:space="preserve">Reptet humi quicunque velit -------------</s>
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          <p style="it">
            <s xml:space="preserve">Cœlo reſtat iter, cœlo tentabimus ire.</s>
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        <div type="section" level="1" n="44">
          <head xml:space="preserve">FINIS.</head>
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