Wilkins, John, A discovery of a new world : or a discourse tending to prove, that 'tis probable there may be another Habitable World in the Moon ; with a discourse concerning the Probability of a Passage thither; unto which is added, a discourse concerning a New Planet, tending to prove, that 'tis probable our earth is one of the Planets

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That the Earth may be a Planet.
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              <pb o="123" file="0303" n="303" rhead="That the Earth may be a Planet."/>
            has been found, (ſay thoſe that have been
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            verſed in theſe kind of Experiments) that
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            the ſame force will caſt a Body but an equal
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            diſtance, whether or no the Body do move
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            with, or againſt the motion of the Ship.
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            </s>
            <s xml:space="preserve">As alſo, that any Weight being let fall, will
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            deſcend in as true a perpendicular, as if
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            the Ship did ſtand ſtill. </s>
            <s xml:space="preserve">If a Man, leaping
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            up, do tarry in the Air one ſecond ſcruple
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            of an hour, yet the Ship will not, in its
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            greateſt ſwiftneſs (as it ſhould according to
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            the calculation of our Adverſaries) be car-
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            ried from him at leaſt fifteen foot. </s>
            <s xml:space="preserve">If we
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            ſuppoſe a Man to jump in ſuch a Ship, he
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            will not be able to paſs farther, when he
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            jumps againſt the motion of it, than when
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            he jumps with it. </s>
            <s xml:space="preserve">All which Particulars
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            may argue, that theſe things are carried a-
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            long together, by the common motion of
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            the Ship. </s>
            <s xml:space="preserve">Now if Bodies may be thus joint-
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            ly moved by ſuch a preternatural motion,
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            much more then will they accompany the
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            Earth in its Diurnal Revolution, which
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            we ſuppoſe to be natural unto them, and
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            as a Law impoſed by God in their firſt Crea-
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            tion.</s>
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            <s xml:space="preserve">If the Flame of a Candle, or the Smoke
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            that comes from it, (things that are ſo ea-
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            ſily moveable) are, notwithſtanding, carried
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            ſo equally, and without and diſturbance, by
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            the motion of a Ship; </s>
            <s xml:space="preserve">then alſo the Clouds
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            in the Air, and all other light Bodies, may
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            well enough be turned about by the Revolu-
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            tion of our Earth.</s>
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