Wilkins, John, A discovery of a new world : or a discourse tending to prove, that 'tis probable there may be another Habitable World in the Moon ; with a discourse concerning the Probability of a Passage thither; unto which is added, a discourse concerning a New Planet, tending to prove, that 'tis probable our earth is one of the Planets
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That the Moon may be a World.
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          <pb o="91" file="0103" n="103" rhead="That the Moon may be a World."/>
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            <s xml:space="preserve">Now, where there be many Hills, the
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            Ground ſeems even to a Man that can ſee the
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            Tops of all. </s>
            <s xml:space="preserve">Thus when the Sea rages, and
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            many vaſt Waves are lifted up, yet all may
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            appear plain enough to one that ſtands at the
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            Shore. </s>
            <s xml:space="preserve">So where there are ſo many Hills, the
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            inequality will be leſs remarkable, if it be diſ-
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            cern'd at a diſtance.</s>
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          <p>
            <s xml:space="preserve">2. </s>
            <s xml:space="preserve">Though there be Mountains in that part
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            which appears unto us to be the Limb of the
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            Moon, as well as in any other place, yet the
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            bright Vapours hide their appearance: </s>
            <s xml:space="preserve">for
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            there is an Orb of thick vaporus Air that doth
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            immediately compaſs the Body of the Moon,
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            which though it have not ſo great Opacity,
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            as to terminate the Sight, yet being once en-
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            lightned by the Sun, it doth repreſent the Bo-
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            dy of the Moon under a greater form, and hin-
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            ders our ſight from a diſtinct view of her true
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            Circumference. </s>
            <s xml:space="preserve">But of this in the next Chap-
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            ter.</s>
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            <s xml:space="preserve">3. </s>
            <s xml:space="preserve">Keplar hath obſerv'd, that in the Solary
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              <anchor type="note" xlink:label="note-0103-01a" xlink:href="note-0103-01"/>
            Eclipſes, when the Rays may paſs through this
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            vaporous Air, there are ſome Gibboſities to
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            be diſcern'd in the Limb of the Moon.</s>
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            <note position="right" xlink:label="note-0103-01" xlink:href="note-0103-01a" xml:space="preserve">Somn. Aſtr.
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            not. 207.</note>
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            <s xml:space="preserve">I have now ſufficiently prov'd, that there
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            are Hills in the Moon, and hence it may ſeem
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            likely, that there is alſo a World; </s>
            <s xml:space="preserve">for ſince
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            Providence hath ſome ſpecial end in all its
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            Works, certainly then theſe Mountains were
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            not produc'd in vain; </s>
            <s xml:space="preserve">and what more proba-
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            ble meaning can we conceive there ſhould be,
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            than to make that place convenient for Habi-
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            tation?</s>
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