Wilkins, John, A discovery of a new world : or a discourse tending to prove, that 'tis probable there may be another Habitable World in the Moon ; with a discourse concerning the Probability of a Passage thither; unto which is added, a discourse concerning a New Planet, tending to prove, that 'tis probable our earth is one of the Planets
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That the Moon may be a World.
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          <pb o="129" file="0141" n="141" rhead="That the Moon may be a World."/>
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            <s xml:space="preserve">The Prieſt of Saturn relating to Plutarch
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            (as he feigns it) the nature of theſe Selenites,
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            told him, they were of divers diſpoſitions,
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            ſome deſiring to live in the lower parts of the
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            Moon, where they might look downwards
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            upon us, while others were more ſurely moun-
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            ted aloft, all of them ſhining like the Rays of
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            the Sun, and as being Victorious, are Crow-
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            ned with Garlands made with the Wings of
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            Euſtathia or Gonſtancie.</s>
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          <p>
            <s xml:space="preserve">It hath been the Opinion amongſt ſome of
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            the Ancients, that their Heavens and Elyſian
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            Fields were in the Moon where the Air is moſt
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            quiet and pure. </s>
            <s xml:space="preserve">Thus Socrates, thus Plato, with
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              <anchor type="note" xlink:label="note-0141-01a" xlink:href="note-0141-01"/>
            his Followers, did eſteem this to be the place
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            where thoſe purer Souls inhabit, who are
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            freed from the Sepulcher, and Contagion of
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            the Body: </s>
            <s xml:space="preserve">And by the Fable of Geres, con-
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            tinually wandring in ſearch of her Daughter
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            Proſerpina, is meant nothing elſe but the long-
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            ing deſire of Men, who live upon Geres Earth,
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            to attain a place in Proſerpina, the Moon Hea-
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            ven.</s>
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            <note position="right" xlink:label="note-0141-01" xlink:href="note-0141-01a" xml:space="preserve">Nat. Com.
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            l. 3. c. 19</note>
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          <p>
            <s xml:space="preserve">Plutarch alſo ſeems to aſſent unto this; </s>
            <s xml:space="preserve">but
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            he thinks moreover, that there are two places
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            of happineſs anſwerable to thoſe two parts
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            which he fancies to remain of a Man when he
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            is Dead, the Soul and the Underſtanding; </s>
            <s xml:space="preserve">the
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            Soul he thinks is made of the Moon; </s>
            <s xml:space="preserve">and as
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            our Bodies do ſo proceed from the Duſt of this
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            Earth, that they ſhall return to it hereafter;
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            </s>
            <s xml:space="preserve">ſo our Souls were generated out of that Pla-
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            net, and ſhall be reſolved into it again; </s>
            <s xml:space="preserve">where-
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            as the underſtanding ſhall aſcend unto the Sun,
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            out of which it was made, where it ſhall poſ-</s>
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