Wilkins, John, A discovery of a new world : or a discourse tending to prove, that 'tis probable there may be another Habitable World in the Moon ; with a discourse concerning the Probability of a Passage thither; unto which is added, a discourse concerning a New Planet, tending to prove, that 'tis probable our earth is one of the Planets
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That the Earth may be a Planet.
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              <pb o="85" file="0265" n="265" rhead="That the Earth may be a Planet."/>
            we fancy about it, FGHI the Orb of fixed
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            Stars, R the Centre of them. </s>
            <s xml:space="preserve">Now though
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            the Arch, G F I, be bigger than the other,
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            GHI, yet notwithſtanding, to the Eye on
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            the Earth A, one will appear a Semicircle as
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            well as the other; </s>
            <s xml:space="preserve">becauſe the Imagination
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            does transfer all thoſe Stars into the leſſer
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            Circle, BCDE, which it does fancy to be
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            deſcribed above that Centre. </s>
            <s xml:space="preserve">Nay, though
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            there were a habitable Earth, at a far grea-
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            ter diſtance from the Centre of the World,
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            even in the place of Jupiter; </s>
            <s xml:space="preserve">as ſuppoſe at
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            Q, yet then alſo would there be the ſame
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            appearance. </s>
            <s xml:space="preserve">For though the Arch, KFL,
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            in the ſtarry Heaven, were twice as big as
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            the other, KHL, yet notwithſtanding, at
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            the Earth Q, they would both appear but
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            as equal Hemiſpheres, being transferred in-
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            to that other Circle, MNOP, which is part
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            of the Sphere that the Eye deſcribes to it
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            ſelf about the Earth.</s>
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            <s xml:space="preserve">From whence we may plainly diſcern,
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            That though the Earth be never ſo far di-
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            ftant from the Centre of the World; </s>
            <s xml:space="preserve">yet
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            the Parts and Degrees of that imaginary
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            Sphere about it, will always be propor-
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            tional to the Parts and Degrees of the
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            Earth.</s>
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            <s xml:space="preserve">Arg. </s>
            <s xml:space="preserve">2. </s>
            <s xml:space="preserve">Another Demonſtration like un-
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            to this former, frequently urged to the ſame
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            purpoſe, is this: </s>
            <s xml:space="preserve">If the Earth be out of the
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            Centre of the World, then muſt it be ſci-
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            tuated in one of theſe three Poſitions : </s>
            <s xml:space="preserve">ei-
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              <anchor type="note" xlink:label="note-0265-01a" xlink:href="note-0265-01"/>
            ther in the Equator, but out of the Axis;</s>
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