Wilkins, John, A discovery of a new world : or a discourse tending to prove, that 'tis probable there may be another Habitable World in the Moon ; with a discourse concerning the Probability of a Passage thither; unto which is added, a discourse concerning a New Planet, tending to prove, that 'tis probable our earth is one of the Planets
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That the Moon may be a World.
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              <pb o="82" file="0094" n="94" rhead="That the Moon may be a World."/>
            ‘not be amiſs to ſay that the parts of the Moon
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            ‘were divers, as the parts of the Earth, where-
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            ‘of ſome are Vallies, and ſome Mountains,
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            ‘from the difference of which, ſome ſpots in
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            ‘the Moon may proceed; </s>
            <s xml:space="preserve">nor is this againſt
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            ‘Reaſon; </s>
            <s xml:space="preserve">for that Planet cannot be perfectly
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            ‘Spherical, ſince ’tis ſo remote a Body from
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            ‘the firſt Orb, as Ariſtotle had ſaid before.
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            </s>
            <s xml:space="preserve">You may ſee this Truth aſſented unto by Blan-
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              <anchor type="note" xlink:label="note-0094-01a" xlink:href="note-0094-01"/>
            canus the Jeſuite, and by him confirmed with
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            divers Reaſons. </s>
            <s xml:space="preserve">Keplar hath obſerved in the
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            Moons Eclipſes, that the Diviſion of her en-
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              <anchor type="note" xlink:label="note-0094-02a" xlink:href="note-0094-02"/>
            lightned part from the ſhaded, was made by
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            a crooked unequal Line, of which there can-
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            not be any probable cauſe conceiv'd, unleſs it
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            did ariſe from the ruggedneſs of that Planet;
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            </s>
            <s xml:space="preserve">for it cannot all be produc'd from the ſhade of
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            any Mountains here on Earth, becauſe theſe
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            would be ſo leſſened before they could reach
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            ſo high in a Conical Shadow, that they would
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            not be at all ſenſible unto us (as might eaſily
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            be demonſtrated) nor can it be conceiv'd what
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            reaſon of this difference there ſhould be in the
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            Sun. </s>
            <s xml:space="preserve">Wherefore there being no other Body
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            that hath any thing to do in Eclipſes, we muſt
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            neceſſarily conclude, that it is cauſed by varie-
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            ty of parts in the Moon it ſelf, and what can
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            theſe be but its Gibboſities ? </s>
            <s xml:space="preserve">Now if you
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            ſhould ask a reaſon why there ſhould be ſuch a
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            multitude of theſe in that Planet, the ſame
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            Keplar ſhall jeſt you out an anſwer. </s>
            <s xml:space="preserve">Suppoſing
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            (ſaith he) that thoſe Inhabitants are bigger than
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            any of of us in the ſame proportion, as their
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            days are longer than ours, viz. </s>
            <s xml:space="preserve">by Fifteeen
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            times it may be, for want of Stones to erect ſuch</s>
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