Wilkins, John, A discovery of a new world : or a discourse tending to prove, that 'tis probable there may be another Habitable World in the Moon ; with a discourse concerning the Probability of a Passage thither; unto which is added, a discourse concerning a New Planet, tending to prove, that 'tis probable our earth is one of the Planets
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That the Earth may be a Planet.
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              <pb o="120" file="0300" n="300" rhead="That the Earth may be a Planet."/>
            on, Variation, Declination; </s>
            <s xml:space="preserve">the two laſt of
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            which are found to be indifferent, according
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            to the variety of places. </s>
            <s xml:space="preserve">Now this diffe-
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            rence cannot proceed from the Needle it
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            ſelf, becauſe that is the ſame every where.
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            </s>
            <s xml:space="preserve">Nor can we well conceive how it ſhould be
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            cauſed by the Heavens; </s>
            <s xml:space="preserve">for then the Varia-
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            tion would not be always alike in the ſame
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            place, but diverſe, according to thoſe ſeve-
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            ral parts of the Heaven, which at ſeveral
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            times ſhould happen to be over it: </s>
            <s xml:space="preserve">And
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            therefore it muſt neceſſarily proceed from
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            the Earth, which being it ſelf endowed with
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            Magnetical Affections, does diverſly diſpoſe
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            the Motions of the Needle, according to the
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            diſſerence of that diſponent virtue, which is
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            in its ſeveral Parts.</s>
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            <s xml:space="preserve">Now, to apply this unto the particular
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            Inſtances of the Objection: </s>
            <s xml:space="preserve">We ſay, though
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            ſome parts of this great Magnet, the Earth,
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            may, according to their Matter, be ſevered
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            from the whole; </s>
            <s xml:space="preserve">yet are they always joined
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            to it, by a communion of the ſame Magne-
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            tical Qualities; </s>
            <s xml:space="preserve">and do no leſs obſerve theſe
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            kind of Motions, when they are ſeparated
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            from the whole, than if they were united
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            to it. </s>
            <s xml:space="preserve">Nor need this ſeem incredible, that
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            a heavy Bullet, in ſuch a ſwift violent courſe,
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            ſhould be able to obſerve this Magnetical
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            Revolution of the whole Earth; </s>
            <s xml:space="preserve">when as
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            we ſee that thoſe great Bodies of Saturn,
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            Jupiter, &</s>
            <s xml:space="preserve">c. </s>
            <s xml:space="preserve">hanging in the vaſt ſpaces of
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            the Ætherial Air, do ſo conſtantly and re-
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            gularly move on in their appointed courſes.</s>
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