Wilkins, John, A discovery of a new world : or a discourse tending to prove, that 'tis probable there may be another Habitable World in the Moon ; with a discourse concerning the Probability of a Passage thither; unto which is added, a discourse concerning a New Planet, tending to prove, that 'tis probable our earth is one of the Planets
page |< < (88) of 370 > >|
That the Moon may be a World.
    <echo version="1.0RC">
      <text xml:lang="en" type="free">
        <div type="section" level="1" n="37">
          <p>
            <s xml:space="preserve">
              <pb o="88" file="0100" n="100" rhead="That the Moon may be a World."/>
            of the Hegheſt. </s>
            <s xml:space="preserve">Nay, Solinus (whom I ſhould
              <lb/>
              <anchor type="note" xlink:label="note-0100-01a" xlink:href="note-0100-01"/>
            rather believe in this kind) affirms, that this
              <lb/>
            Mountain gives his ſhadow quite over the Sea,
              <lb/>
            from Macedon to the Iſle of Lemnos, which is
              <lb/>
            700 Furlongs, or 84 Miles, and yet according
              <lb/>
            to the common Reckoning, it doth ſcarce reach
              <lb/>
            4 Miles up wards, in its Perpendicular height.</s>
            <s xml:space="preserve"/>
          </p>
          <div type="float" level="2" n="8">
            <note position="right" xlink:label="note-0099-01" xlink:href="note-0099-01a" xml:space="preserve">Hiſt. l. 1.c.
              <lb/>
            7. Sect. 11.</note>
            <note position="left" xlink:label="note-0100-01" xlink:href="note-0100-01a" xml:space="preserve">Pely. biſtor.
              <lb/>
            6. 21.</note>
          </div>
          <p>
            <s xml:space="preserve">2. </s>
            <s xml:space="preserve">I affirm, that there are very high Moun-
              <lb/>
            tains in the Moon. </s>
            <s xml:space="preserve">Keplar and Galilæus think,
              <lb/>
            that they are higher than any which are upon
              <lb/>
            our Earth. </s>
            <s xml:space="preserve">But I am not of their Opinion in this,
              <lb/>
            becauſe I ſuppoſe they go upon a falſe Ground,
              <lb/>
            whilſt they Conceive, that the higheſt Moun-
              <lb/>
            tain upon the Earth is not above a Mile Per-
              <lb/>
            pendicular.</s>
            <s xml:space="preserve"/>
          </p>
          <p>
            <s xml:space="preserve">Whereas ’tis the common Opinion, and found
              <lb/>
            true enough by Obſervation, that Olympus,
              <lb/>
            Atlas, Taurus and Emus, with many others, are
              <lb/>
            much above this height. </s>
            <s xml:space="preserve">Tenariffa in the
              <lb/>
            Canary Iſlands, is commonly related to be
              <lb/>
            above 8 Miles Perpendicular, and about this
              <lb/>
            height (ſay ſome) is the Mount Perjacaca in
              <lb/>
            America. </s>
            <s xml:space="preserve">
              <anchor type="note" xlink:href="" symbol="*"/>
            Sir Walter Rawleigh ſeems to think,
              <anchor type="note" xlink:label="note-0100-02a" xlink:href="note-0100-02"/>
            that the higheſt of theſe is near 30 Miles up-
              <lb/>
            right. </s>
            <s xml:space="preserve">nay, Ariſtotle ſpeaking of Gaucaſus in
              <lb/>
            Aſia, affirins it to be Viſible for 560 Miles, as
              <lb/>
            ſome Interpreters find by Computation; </s>
            <s xml:space="preserve">from
              <lb/>
            which it will follow, that it was 78 Miles Per-
              <lb/>
            pendicularly high, as you may ſee confirm'd by
              <lb/>
            Facobus Mazonius, and out of him in Blancanus
              <lb/>
              <anchor type="note" xlink:label="note-0100-03a" xlink:href="note-0100-03"/>
            the Jeſuit. </s>
            <s xml:space="preserve">But this Deviates from the truth,
              <lb/>
            more in Exceſs, than the other doth in defect.
              <lb/>
            </s>
            <s xml:space="preserve">However, though theſe in the Moon are
              <lb/>
            not ſo high asſome amongſt us; </s>
            <s xml:space="preserve">yet certain
              <lb/>
            it is they are of a great height, and ſome of</s>
          </p>
        </div>
      </text>
    </echo>