Wilkins, John, A discovery of a new world : or a discourse tending to prove, that 'tis probable there may be another Habitable World in the Moon ; with a discourse concerning the Probability of a Passage thither; unto which is added, a discourse concerning a New Planet, tending to prove, that 'tis probable our earth is one of the Planets
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That the Moon may be a World.
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              <pb o="106" file="0118" n="118" rhead="That the Moon may be a World."/>
            only one ſmall part of her Body enlightned,
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            then the Earth B will have ſuch a part of its
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            viſible Hemiſphere darkned, as is proportio-
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            nable to that part of the Moon which is en-
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            lightned; </s>
            <s xml:space="preserve">and as for ſo much of the Moon, as
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            the Sun-Beams cannot reach unto, it receives
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            Light from a proportional part of the Earth
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            which ſhines upon it, as you may plainly per-
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            ceive by the Figure.</s>
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            <s xml:space="preserve">You ſee then that Agreement and Simili-
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            tude which there is betwixt our Earth and the
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            Moon. </s>
            <s xml:space="preserve">Now the greateſt difference which
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            makes them unlike, is this, that the Moon en-
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            lightens our Earth round about, whereas our
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            Earth gives Light to that Hemiſphere of the
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            Moon which is viſible unto us, as may be cer-
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            tainly gather’d from the conſtant appearance
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            of the ſame ſpots, which could not thus come
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            to paſs, if the Moon had ſuch a Diurnal mo-
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            tion about its own Axis, as perhaps our
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            Earth hath. </s>
            <s xml:space="preserve">And though ſome ſuppoſe her
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            to move in an Epicycle, yet this doth not ſo
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            turn her Body round, that we may diſcern
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            both Hemiſpheres; </s>
            <s xml:space="preserve">for according to that Hy-
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            potheſis (ſay they) the Motion of her Eccen-
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            centrick doth turn her Face towards us, as
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            much as the other doth from us.</s>
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            <s xml:space="preserve">But now, if any Queſtion what they do for
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            a Moon who live in the upper part of her Bo-
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            dy? </s>
            <s xml:space="preserve">I anſwer, the ſolving of this, is the moſt
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            uncertain and difficult thing that I know of,
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            concerning this whole matter. </s>
            <s xml:space="preserve">But yet unto me
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            this ſeems a probable Conjecture.</s>
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            <s xml:space="preserve">That the upper Hemiſphere of the Moon
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            doth receive a ſufficient Light from thoſe Pla-</s>
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