Wilkins, John, A discovery of a new world : or a discourse tending to prove, that 'tis probable there may be another Habitable World in the Moon ; with a discourse concerning the Probability of a Passage thither; unto which is added, a discourse concerning a New Planet, tending to prove, that 'tis probable our earth is one of the Planets
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That the Moon may be a World.
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              <pb o="17" file="0029" n="29" rhead="That the Moon may be a World."/>
            Before he thought to ſeat himſelf next the
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            Gods: </s>
            <s xml:space="preserve">but now when he had done his beſt,
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            he muſt be content with ſome Equal, or per-
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            haps Superiour Kings.</s>
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          </p>
          <p>
            <s xml:space="preserve">It may be, that Ariſtotle was moved to this
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            Opinion, that he might thereby take from
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            Alexander the occaſion of this Fear and Diſ-
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            content; </s>
            <s xml:space="preserve">or elſe, perhaps Ariſtotle himſelf was
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            as loth to hold the Poſſibility of a World
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            which he could not diſcover, as Alexander was
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            to hear of one which he could not Conquer.
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            </s>
            <s xml:space="preserve">’Tis likely that ſome ſuch by-reſpect moved
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            him to this Opinion, ſince the Arguments he
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            urges for it, are confeſt by his Zealous Fol-
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            lowers and Commentators, to be very ſlight
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            and frivolous, and they themſelves grant, what
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            I am now to prove, that there is not any Evi-
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            dence in the Light of natural Reaſon, which
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            can ſufficiently manifeſt that there is but one
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            World.</s>
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          <p>
            <s xml:space="preserve">But however ſome may Object, would it
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            not be inconvenient and dangerous to admit
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            of ſuch Opinions that do deſtroy thoſe Princi-
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            ples of Ariſtotle, which all the World hath ſo
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            long Followed?</s>
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            <s xml:space="preserve">This queſtion is much controverted by ſome
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              <anchor type="note" xlink:label="note-0029-01a" xlink:href="note-0029-01"/>
            of the Romiſb Divines; </s>
            <s xml:space="preserve">Campanella hath Writ
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            a Treatiſe in defence of it, in whom you may
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            ſee many things worth the Reading and No-
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            tice.</s>
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            <note position="right" xlink:label="note-0029-01" xlink:href="note-0029-01a" xml:space="preserve">Apologia
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            pro Galilæo.</note>
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            <s xml:space="preserve">To it I anſwer, That this Poſition in Philo-
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            ſophy, doth not bring any Inconvenience to
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            the reſt, ſince ’tis not Ariſtotle, but Truth that
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            ſhould be the Rule of our Opinions, and if
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            they be not both found together, we may ſay</s>
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