Wilkins, John, A discovery of a new world : or a discourse tending to prove, that 'tis probable there may be another Habitable World in the Moon ; with a discourse concerning the Probability of a Passage thither; unto which is added, a discourse concerning a New Planet, tending to prove, that 'tis probable our earth is one of the Planets
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That the Earth may be a Planet.
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              <pb o="114" file="0294" n="294" rhead="That the Earth may be a Planet."/>
            be no impediment to the Act of ſeeing, but
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            it would be all one with the reſt; </s>
            <s xml:space="preserve">becauſe
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            by this means, they are not ſevered from
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            one another; </s>
            <s xml:space="preserve">and therefore the ſpecies are
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            not diſturbed. </s>
            <s xml:space="preserve">’Tis an excellent ſaying of
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              <anchor type="note" xlink:href="" symbol="*"/>
            Gallilæus, and may ſerve for the reſoluti-
              <anchor type="note" xlink:label="note-0294-01a" xlink:href="note-0294-01"/>
            on of many ſuch Doubts as theſe; </s>
            <s xml:space="preserve">Motus
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            eatenus tanquàm motus operatur, quatenus rela-
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            tionem habet ad eas res quæ ipſo deſtituuntur; </s>
            <s xml:space="preserve">in
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            iis verò rebus, quæ totæ æqualiter de eo partici-
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            pant, nibil operatur, & </s>
            <s xml:space="preserve">ita ſe habet ac ſi nul-
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            lus eſſet. </s>
            <s xml:space="preserve">If a Man be within ſome Room of
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            a Ship, he may read altogether as eaſily
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            when the Ship moves, as when it ſtands
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            ſtill.</s>
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            <note symbol="*" position="left" xlink:label="note-0294-01" xlink:href="note-0294-01a" xml:space="preserve">Syſt.
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            mundi,
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            Colloq. 2.</note>
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            <s xml:space="preserve">4. </s>
            <s xml:space="preserve">Another Argument againſt this circular
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            motion of the Earth, is grounded upon that
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            common Principle amongſt the Ariſtotelians;
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            </s>
            <s xml:space="preserve">Vnius corporis ſimplicis unus tantùm eſt motus: </s>
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              <lb/>
            One kind of Body, has but one kind of Mo-
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            tion. </s>
            <s xml:space="preserve">But now, the Earth and Water hath
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            a motion of deſcent: </s>
            <s xml:space="preserve">the Air, a motion of
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            aſcent; </s>
            <s xml:space="preserve">and therefore none of them can
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            have any circular motion natural unto
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            them.</s>
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          <p>
            <s xml:space="preserve">I anſwer: </s>
            <s xml:space="preserve">Firſt, Theſe right Motions of
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            Elementary Bodies, belong only to the parts
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            of them, and that too when they are out of
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            their proper places; </s>
            <s xml:space="preserve">ſo that the whole to
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            which they belong, may, notwithſtanding
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            this, have another Motion of its own. </s>
            <s xml:space="preserve">But,
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            ſecondly, this ſaying which Ariſtotle calls a
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            Principle, will not conſiſt with other evi-
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            dent Experiments of Nature. </s>
            <s xml:space="preserve">Thus, though</s>
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