Wilkins, John, A discovery of a new world : or a discourse tending to prove, that 'tis probable there may be another Habitable World in the Moon ; with a discourse concerning the Probability of a Passage thither; unto which is added, a discourse concerning a New Planet, tending to prove, that 'tis probable our earth is one of the Planets
page |< < (75) of 370 > >|
That the Moon may be a World.
    <echo version="1.0RC">
      <text xml:lang="en" type="free">
        <div type="section" level="1" n="36">
          <p>
            <s xml:space="preserve">
              <pb o="75" file="0087" n="87" rhead="That the Moon may be a World."/>
            ny of our Prodigies come to paſs, and the
              <lb/>
            People are willing to believe any thing, which
              <lb/>
            they may relate to others as a very ſtrange and
              <lb/>
            wonderful Event. </s>
            <s xml:space="preserve">I doubt not but the Trojan
              <lb/>
            Palladium, the Roman Minerva, and our La-
              <lb/>
            dies Church at Loretto, with many ſacred Re-
              <lb/>
            liques preſerv'd by the Papiſts might drop
              <lb/>
            from the Moon as well as any of theſe.</s>
            <s xml:space="preserve"/>
          </p>
          <div type="float" level="2" n="8">
            <note position="left" xlink:label="note-0086-01" xlink:href="note-0086-01a" xml:space="preserve">Vide Guli.
              <lb/>
            Nubrigenſ.
              <lb/>
            de rebus.
              <lb/>
            Anglicæ.
              <lb/>
            lib. 1.</note>
          </div>
          <p>
            <s xml:space="preserve">But it may be again Objected, ſuppoſe there
              <lb/>
            were a Bullet ſhot up in that World, would
              <lb/>
            not the Moon run away from it; </s>
            <s xml:space="preserve">before it
              <lb/>
            could fall down, ſince the Motion of her Bo-
              <lb/>
            dy (being every day round our Earth) is far
              <lb/>
            ſwifter than the other, and ſo the Bullet muſt
              <lb/>
            be left behind, and at length fall down to us?
              <lb/>
            </s>
            <s xml:space="preserve">To this I anſwer.</s>
            <s xml:space="preserve"/>
          </p>
          <p>
            <s xml:space="preserve">1. </s>
            <s xml:space="preserve">If a Bullet could be ſhot ſo far till it
              <lb/>
            it came to the Circumference of thoſe things
              <lb/>
            which belong to our Centre, then it would
              <lb/>
            fall down to us.</s>
            <s xml:space="preserve"/>
          </p>
          <p>
            <s xml:space="preserve">2. </s>
            <s xml:space="preserve">Though there were ſome Heavy Body
              <lb/>
            a great Height in that Air, yet would the Mo-
              <lb/>
            tion of that Magnetical Globe to which it did
              <lb/>
            belong by an attractive Virtue, ſtill hold it
              <lb/>
            within its convenient diſtance, whether their
              <lb/>
            Earth moved or ſtood ſtill, yet would the
              <lb/>
            ſame Violence caſt a Body from it equally far.
              <lb/>
            </s>
            <s xml:space="preserve">That I may the plainer expreſs my meaning,
              <lb/>
            I will ſet down this Diagram.</s>
            <s xml:space="preserve"/>
          </p>
        </div>
      </text>
    </echo>