Wilkins, John, A discovery of a new world : or a discourse tending to prove, that 'tis probable there may be another Habitable World in the Moon ; with a discourse concerning the Probability of a Passage thither; unto which is added, a discourse concerning a New Planet, tending to prove, that 'tis probable our earth is one of the Planets
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That the Moon may be a World.
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              <pb o="78" file="0090" n="90" rhead="That the Moon may be a World."/>
            Scotland, whoſe greateſt protection hath been
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            the natural Strength of their Country, ſo For-
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            tified with Mountains, that theſe have always
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            been unto them ſure Retreats from the Vio-
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            lence and Oppreſſion of others. </s>
            <s xml:space="preserve">Wherefore
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            a good Author doth rightly call them Natures
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            Bul-warks, caſt up at God Almighties own
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            charges, the ſcorns and curbs of victorious
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            Armies; </s>
            <s xml:space="preserve">which made the Barbarians in Gurtius
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            ſo confident of their own ſafety, when they
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            were once retir'd into an acceſſable Mountain,
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            that when Alexanders Legat had brought them
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            to a Parley, and perſwading them to yield, told
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            them of his Maſters Victories, what Seas and
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            Wilderneſſes he had paſſed; </s>
            <s xml:space="preserve">they replyed, that
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            all that might be, but could Alexander fly too?
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            </s>
            <s xml:space="preserve">Over the Seas he might have Ships, and over
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            the Land Horſes, but he muſt have Wings be-
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            fore he could get up thither. </s>
            <s xml:space="preserve">Such ſafety did
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            thoſe barbarous Nations conceive in the Moun-
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            ttins whereunto they were retired. </s>
            <s xml:space="preserve">Certainly
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            then ſuch uſeful parts were not the effects of
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            Mans Sin, or produced by the Worlds Curſe,
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            the Flood, but rather at firſt created by the
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            Goodneſs and Providence of the Almighty.</s>
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            <s xml:space="preserve">This Truth is uſually concluded from theſe
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            and the like Arguments.</s>
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            <s xml:space="preserve">1. </s>
            <s xml:space="preserve">Becauſe the Scripture it ſelf, in the De-
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            ſcription of that general Deluge, tells us, it
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            overflowed the higheſt Mountains.</s>
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            <s xml:space="preserve">2. </s>
            <s xml:space="preserve">Becauſe Moſes, who writ long after the
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            Flood, does yet give the ſame Deſcription
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            of places and Rivers, as they had before;
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            </s>
            <s xml:space="preserve">which could not well have been, if this had
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            made ſo ſtrange an Alteration.</s>
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