Wilkins, John, A discovery of a new world : or a discourse tending to prove, that 'tis probable there may be another Habitable World in the Moon ; with a discourse concerning the Probability of a Passage thither; unto which is added, a discourse concerning a New Planet, tending to prove, that 'tis probable our earth is one of the Planets

Table of contents

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[1. None]
[2. Ex Libris James S. Dearden Rampside]
[3. A DISCOVERY OF A New , OR,]
[4. In Two Parts.]
[5. The Fifth Edition Corrected and Amended. LONDON,]
[6. The Epiſtle to the READER.]
[7. The Propoſitions that are proved in this Diſcourſe. PROPOSITION I.]
[8. PROP. II.]
[9. PROP. III.]
[10. PROP. IV.]
[11. PROP. V.]
[12. PROP. VI.]
[13. PROP. VII.]
[14. PROP. VIII.]
[15. PROP. IX.]
[16. PROP. X.]
[17. PROP. XI.]
[18. PROP. XII.]
[19. PROP. XIII.]
[20. PROP. XIV.]
[21. The Firſt Book. That the MOON May be a WORLD. The Firſt Propoſition, by way of Preface.]
[22. Sed vanus ſtolidis hæc omnia finxerit Error.]
[23. Solis lunæq; labores.]
[24. Cum fruſtra reſonant æra auxiliaria Lunæ.]
[25. Una laboranti poterit ſuccerrere Lunæ.]
[26. Gantus & è cælo poſſunt deducere Lunam.]
[27. Cantus & ſi curru lunam deducere tentant, Et facerent, ſi non æra repulſa ſonant.]
[28. PROP. II. That a Plurality of Worlds doth not contradict any Principle of Reaſon or Faith.]
[29. Æſtuas infelix auguſto limite mundi.]
[30. PROP. III. That the Heavens do not conſiſt of any ſuch pure Matter, which can priviledge them from the like Change and Corruption, as theſe Inferiour, Bodies are liable unto.]
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That the Moon may be a World.
ning theſe, upon which we may build a cer-
tainty, or good probability:
well may we
gueſs at them, and that too very doubtfully,
but we can know nothing;
for, if we do hardly
gueſs aright at things which be upon Earth, if
Wiſd.with labour we do find the things that are at hand,
How then can we ſearch out thoſe things that are
in Heaven?
What a little is that which we
know, in reſpect of thoſe many matters con-
tain’d within this great Univerſe?
This whole
Globe of Earth and Water, though it ſeem
to us to be of a large Extent, yet it bears not
ſo great a proportion unto the whole Frame
of Nature, as a ſmall Sand doth unto it;
and
what can ſuch little Creatures as we diſcern,
who are tyed to this point of Earth?
or what
can they in the Moon know of us?
If we under-
ſtand any thing (ſaith Eſdras) ’tis nothing but
that which is upon the Earth;
and he that dwel-
2 Eſd. 4.
21.
leth above in the Heavens may only underſtand
the things that are above in the height of the
Heavens.
So that ’twere a needleſs thing for us to
ſearch after any particulars;
however, we may
gueſs in the general that there are ſome Inhabi-
tants in that Planet:
for why elſe did Provi-
dence furniſh that place with all ſuch Conve-
niences of Habitation as have been above de-
clar’d?
But you will ſay, perhaps; is there not too
great and intollerable a Heat, ſince the Sun is
their Zenith every Month, and doth tarry there
ſo long before he leaves it.
I Anſwer,
I. This may, perhaps, be remedyed (as it

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