Wilkins, John, A discovery of a new world : or a discourse tending to prove, that 'tis probable there may be another Habitable World in the Moon ; with a discourse concerning the Probability of a Passage thither; unto which is added, a discourse concerning a New Planet, tending to prove, that 'tis probable our earth is one of the Planets

Table of contents

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[1. None]
[2. Ex Libris James S. Dearden Rampside]
[3. A DISCOVERY OF A New , OR,]
[4. In Two Parts.]
[5. The Fifth Edition Corrected and Amended. LONDON,]
[6. The Epiſtle to the READER.]
[7. The Propoſitions that are proved in this Diſcourſe. PROPOSITION I.]
[8. PROP. II.]
[9. PROP. III.]
[10. PROP. IV.]
[11. PROP. V.]
[12. PROP. VI.]
[13. PROP. VII.]
[14. PROP. VIII.]
[15. PROP. IX.]
[16. PROP. X.]
[17. PROP. XI.]
[18. PROP. XII.]
[19. PROP. XIII.]
[20. PROP. XIV.]
[21. The Firſt Book. That the MOON May be a WORLD. The Firſt Propoſition, by way of Preface.]
[22. Sed vanus ſtolidis hæc omnia finxerit Error.]
[23. Solis lunæq; labores.]
[24. Cum fruſtra reſonant æra auxiliaria Lunæ.]
[25. Una laboranti poterit ſuccerrere Lunæ.]
[26. Gantus & è cælo poſſunt deducere Lunam.]
[27. Cantus & ſi curru lunam deducere tentant, Et facerent, ſi non æra repulſa ſonant.]
[28. PROP. II. That a Plurality of Worlds doth not contradict any Principle of Reaſon or Faith.]
[29. Æſtuas infelix auguſto limite mundi.]
[30. PROP. III. That the Heavens do not conſiſt of any ſuch pure Matter, which can priviledge them from the like Change and Corruption, as theſe Inferiour, Bodies are liable unto.]
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That the Moon may be a World.
our Gifts, and beat us with our own Wea-
pons) hath ſo contriv’d it, that any Truth doth
now ſeem diſtaſtful for that very Reaſon, for
which Errour is entertain’d:
Novelty. For
let ſome upſtart Hereſie be ſet abroach, and
preſently there are ſome out of a curious Hu-
mour;
others, as if they watched an occaſion of
ſingularity, will take it up for Canonical, and
make it part of their Creed and Profeſſion;
whereas ſolitary Truth cannot any where find
ſo ready Entertainment;
but the ſame Novel-
ty which is eſteemed the Commendation of
Errour, and makes that acceptable, is counted
the fault of Truth, and cauſes that to be Re-
jected.
How did the incredulous World gaze at Co-
lumbus;
when he promiſed to diſcover ano-
ther part of the Earth, and he could not for
a long time, by his Confidence, or Argu-
ments, induce any of the Chriſtian Princes, ei-
ther to aſſent unto his Opinion, or to go to the
charges of an Experiment?
Now if be, who
had ſuch good grounds for his Aſſertion, could
find no better Entertainment among the wiſer
ſort, and upper end of the World;
’tis not
likely then that this Opinion which I now deli-
ver, ſhall receive any thing from Men of theſe
Days, eſpecially our Vulgar Wits, but Miſ-
belief and Deriſion.
It hath always been the unhappineſs of new
Truths in Philoſophy, to be derided by thoſe
that are ignorant of the cauſes of things, and
rejected by others, whoſe perverſeneſs ties
them to the contrary Opinion, Men whoſe en-
vious Pride will not allow any new thing for

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