Wilkins, John, A discovery of a new world : or a discourse tending to prove, that 'tis probable there may be another Habitable World in the Moon ; with a discourse concerning the Probability of a Passage thither; unto which is added, a discourse concerning a New Planet, tending to prove, that 'tis probable our earth is one of the Planets

Table of contents

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[1. None]
[2. Ex Libris James S. Dearden Rampside]
[3. A DISCOVERY OF A New , OR,]
[4. In Two Parts.]
[5. The Fifth Edition Corrected and Amended. LONDON,]
[6. The Epiſtle to the READER.]
[7. The Propoſitions that are proved in this Diſcourſe. PROPOSITION I.]
[8. PROP. II.]
[9. PROP. III.]
[10. PROP. IV.]
[11. PROP. V.]
[12. PROP. VI.]
[13. PROP. VII.]
[14. PROP. VIII.]
[15. PROP. IX.]
[16. PROP. X.]
[17. PROP. XI.]
[18. PROP. XII.]
[19. PROP. XIII.]
[20. PROP. XIV.]
[21. The Firſt Book. That the MOON May be a WORLD. The Firſt Propoſition, by way of Preface.]
[22. Sed vanus ſtolidis hæc omnia finxerit Error.]
[23. Solis lunæq; labores.]
[24. Cum fruſtra reſonant æra auxiliaria Lunæ.]
[25. Una laboranti poterit ſuccerrere Lunæ.]
[26. Gantus & è cælo poſſunt deducere Lunam.]
[27. Cantus & ſi curru lunam deducere tentant, Et facerent, ſi non æra repulſa ſonant.]
[28. PROP. II. That a Plurality of Worlds doth not contradict any Principle of Reaſon or Faith.]
[29. Æſtuas infelix auguſto limite mundi.]
[30. PROP. III. That the Heavens do not conſiſt of any ſuch pure Matter, which can priviledge them from the like Change and Corruption, as theſe Inferiour, Bodies are liable unto.]
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That the Moon may be a World.
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              <pb o="8" file="0020" n="20" rhead="That the Moon may be a World."/>
            Eclipſe, relates, that at ſuch time it was a
              <lb/>
            cuſtom amongſt the Romans (the moſt civil and
              <lb/>
            Learned People of the World) to ſound Braſs
              <lb/>
            Inſtruments, and hold great Torches toward
              <lb/>
            the Heaven. </s>
            <s xml:space="preserve">Τῶν δε Ρωμαίων (ὤσπερ {ἐστὶ}ν ἐνομισ {μέν}ον)
              <lb/>
            χαλκ{οῦ} τε τατό γι; </s>
            <s xml:space="preserve">ὰνακαλ{ου} μένων τοφῶς ἀυτῆς {καὶ} πυ{ρὰ}
              <lb/>
              <anchor type="note" xlink:label="note-0020-01a" xlink:href="note-0020-01"/>
            πολλὰ δαλοῖς {καὶ} δαοτ
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            ίν ἀνε{χό}ντων πρός {οὐ}ῥοανον. </s>
            <s xml:space="preserve">For
              <lb/>
            by this means they ſuppoſed the Moon was
              <lb/>
            much eaſed in her Labours, and therefore
              <lb/>
            Ovid calls ſuch loud Inſtruments the Auxilia-
              <lb/>
            ries or helps of the Moon.</s>
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            <note position="left" xlink:label="note-0020-01" xlink:href="note-0020-01a" xml:space="preserve">In vita
              <lb/>
            Paul. Æ-
              <lb/>
            mil.</note>
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        <div type="section" level="1" n="24">
          <head style="it" xml:space="preserve">Cum fruſtra reſonant æra auxiliaria Lunæ.</head>
          <note position="left" xml:space="preserve">Metam.
            <lb/>
          Lib. 4.</note>
          <p>
            <s xml:space="preserve">And therefore the Satyriſt too, deſcribing a
              <lb/>
            loud Scold, ſays, ſhe was able to make noiſe
              <lb/>
            enough to deliver the labouring Moon.</s>
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          </p>
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        <div type="section" level="1" n="25">
          <head style="it" xml:space="preserve">Una laboranti poterit ſuccerrere Lunæ.</head>
          <note position="left" xml:space="preserve">Juven.
            <lb/>
          Sat. 6.</note>
          <p>
            <s xml:space="preserve">Now the reaſon of all this their Ceremony,
              <lb/>
            was, becauſe they feared the World would
              <lb/>
            fall aſleep, when one of its Eyes began to
              <lb/>
            wink, and therefore they would do what they
              <lb/>
            could by loud Sounds to rouſe it from its drow-
              <lb/>
            ſineſs, and keep it awake, by bright Torches,
              <lb/>
            to beſtow that Light upon it which it began to
              <lb/>
            lofe.</s>
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          </p>
          <p>
            <s xml:space="preserve">Some of them thought hereby to keep the
              <lb/>
            Moon in her Orb, whereas other wiſe ſhe would
              <lb/>
            have fallen down upon the Earth, and the
              <lb/>
            World would have loſt one of its Lights; </s>
            <s xml:space="preserve">for
              <lb/>
            the credulous People believed, that Inchanters
              <lb/>
            and Witches could bring the Moon down,
              <lb/>
            which made Virgil ſay,</s>
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        <div type="section" level="1" n="26">
          <head style="it" xml:space="preserve">Gantus & è cælo poſſunt deducere Lunam.</head>
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